Alexie, Sherman

Alexie, Sherman

(Sherman Joseph Alexie, Jr.), 1966–, Native American writer, b. Wellpinit, Spokane Indian Reservation, E Wash., studied Gonzaga Univ. and Washington State Univ. (B.A., 1991). Alexie writes of the joys and vicissitudes of Indian (the term he prefers) life in poems, short stories, novels, and films, which he also sometimes directs and coproduces. He describes reservation life in lyrical and witty language, writing of its myths, dances, and sports as well as its oppressive poverty and social problems, and he skillfully delineates his characters. His poems, among his earliest works, are collected in I Would Steal Horses (1992), The Business of Fancydancing, which also included prose (1992, film 2002), First Indian on the Moon (1993), Old Shirts & New Skins (1993), and What I've Stolen, What I've Earned (2014). In 1993 Alexie published a prize-winning collection of related short stories, The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven, which he later adapted into the film Smoke Signals (1998), and his first novel, Reservation Blues (1995), drew on characters developed in the 1993 stories. Other short-story collections include The Toughest Indian in the World (2000), Ten Little Indians (2003), War Dances (2009), and Blasphemy (2012); other novels, Indian Killer (1996), a murder mystery made into a 1999 film that he wrote and directed, Flight (2007), and The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian (2007), a semiautobiographical young-adult novel that won a National Book Award.

Bibliography

See his memoir You Don't Have to Say You Love Me (2017); studies by D. Grassian (2005) and L. Lewis, ed. (2011).

References in periodicals archive ?
Alexie, Sherman. The Accidental Diary of a Part-Time Indian.
Alexie, Sherman. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian.
# ALEXIE, Sherman (text) Ellen Forney (illus.) The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian Andersen, 2008 229pp $19.95 pbk ISBN 9781842708446 SCIS 1382757
Alexie, Sherman. "This is What it Means to Say Phoenix Arizona." In The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven.
Because Lillian Alexie, Sherman's mother, was able to translate the song into Spokane, the song is especially powerful in its iteration of heterosexual Spokane love and spiritual traditions (Brill de Ramirez 194-195).
Alexie, Sherman. "some of my best friends." Los Angeles Times (23 Jan.
Alexie, Sherman. The Business of Fancydancing: Stories and Poems by Sherman Alexie.
Alexie, Sherman. New York: Atlantic Monthly Press, 1993.