Alexy II

Alexy II

or

Aleksy II

(əlyĕk`sē), 1929–2008, 15th patriarch of Moscow and all Russia (1990–2008), b. Estonia, as Aleksey Mikhailovich Ridiger. He spent 11 years as a Russian Orthodox parish priest before becoming bishop of Tallinn and Estonia in 1961. Alexy went to Moscow in 1962, served (1964–68) as archbishop in Moscow, and was (1968–90) metropolitan of Leningrad (now St. Petersburg) and Novgorod. In 1990 he was elected patriarch of Moscow (head of the Russian Orthodox Church). As patriarch under GorbachevGorbachev, Mikhail Sergeyevich
, 1931–, Soviet political leader. Born in the agricultural region of Stavropol, Gorbachev studied law at Moscow State Univ., where in 1953 he married a philosophy student, Raisa Maksimovna Titorenko (1932?–99).
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 and during the disintegration of Communist rule, the dissolution of the Soviet Union, and the reestablishment of an independent Russia, Alexy oversaw a great revival in the Russian church and its influence, including the restoration and construction of cathedrals and the introduction of Orthodox religious education in public schools. He also cultivated close ties with Vladimir PutinPutin, Vladimir Vladimirovich
, 1952–, Russian government official and political leader, b. Leningrad (now St. Petersburg). After graduating from the Leningrad State Univ.
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 and was successful in persuading the government to limit the growth of competing Christian denominations. He was succeeded as patriarch by KirillKirill
, 16th patriarch of Moscow and all Russia (2009–), b. Leningrad (now St. Petersburg) as Vladimir Mikhailovich Gundyayev. The son and grandson of Russian Orthodox priests, he became a priest in 1969 and subsequently taught at and was rector of the Leningrad seminary.
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. His name sometimes appears as Alexi and Aleksiy.
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References in periodicals archive ?
With this meeting, Ivanov rounded off his 2day visit to Moscow where Patriarch Kirill II of Moscow and all Russia presented him with the prestigious prize "His Holiness Patriarch Alexy II of Moscow and All Russia" for 2016.
The FEPN Award given on behalf of Patriarch Alexy II is an annual award given for persons who promote Christian values in society and the strengthening of the unity of the Orthodox peoples.
President Gjorge Ivanov is the laureate of the award His Holiness Patriarch of Moscow and All Russia Alexy II for 2016.
Patriarch Alexy II, then head of the Russian Orthodox Church, sanctified it in 2000.
Although Eastern Orthodoxy is not organized for collective declarations, volume 2 includes important statements by the Patriarch of Moscow and all Russia, Alexy II, and the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, Bartholomew.
Documents from the KGB archives have confirmed what sensible observers had long ago deduced from his actions: that Patriarch Alexy II (also spelled Alexi or Alexei) was a long-serving KGB agent (code-named Drozdov, "Blackbird"), in other words, a traitor to his Christian brethren and the God he claimed to serve.
In the 1990s, Patriarch Alexy II did acknowledge the fact that the bishops (including him) had come to an understanding with the Soviet government and now publicly regretted these compromises.
In Moscow, Ilya II will be awarded the Patriarch Alexy II Prize for the spiritual unity of Russia and Georgia.
Abbas, who will be awarded the Patriarch Alexy II honorary award, said : "'As we used to, we will go to another Republic of the Russian Federation; this time to the republic of Chuvashia.
18) Although many viewed the presidential election as an example of "managed democracy," whereby Russia's electorate merely validated a choice already predetermined by the Kremlin, (19) no one could have predicted that Alexy II, leader of the Russian Orthodox Church since his appointment in 1990, would die less than one year later (20) and leave the position of Patriarch an open race.
Kirill was named "guardian of the throne" of the Orthodox Church on Saturday, a day after the death of Patriarch Alexy II, who had led the Church since 1990 through its post-communist revival.
Both Alexy II, Patriarch of Moscow and All Russia, and Ilia II, Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia, have cited the Orthodox-on-Orthodox nature of the violence as especially tragic.