Alpheus

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Alpheus

, in Greek mythology
Alpheus (ălfēˈəs), river god: see Arethusa.

Alpheus

, river, Greece
Alpheus (ălfēˈəs) or Alfiós (älfēôsˈ), river, c.70 mi (110 km) long, rising in the Taygetus Mts., S Greece. The longest river in the Peloponnesus, it flows northwest through gorges, past Olympia, and onto the Olympia plains before entering the Ionian Sea. In Greek mythology, its waters were said to pass under the sea and to emerge at Syracuse (Italy) in the fountain of Arethusa. Hercules, to clean the stables of Augeas, turned the Alpheus through them. It is the river Alph of Coleridge's poem Kubla Khan. The lower Alpheus was formerly known as Rouphia.
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Alpheus

hunter pursuing Arethusa is turned into a river. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 26]

Alpheus

river god. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 18]
See: Water
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.