Alfred Sauvy


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Sauvy, Alfred

 

Born Oct. 31, 1898, in Villeneuve-de-la-Raho, Eastern Pyrenees. French sociologist, demographer, and economist.

In 1946, Sauvy organized the National Institute of Demographic Studies, which he directed until 1963, while concurrently serving as editor of the journal Population. He became chairman of the department of social demography of the Collège de France in 1959. Sauvy is honorary president of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population.

Sauvy developed his basic theories in the work General Population Theory (vols. 1–2, 1952–54). His works reveal a historical approach to demographic processes. A resolute opponent of Malthusianism, Sauvy advanced a program of democratic and structural reforms of France’s socioeconomic system. An advocate of the peaceful coexistence of capitalism and socialism, Sauvy believes that the social prejudices and economic dogmas of modern capitalist society are obstacles to a rational solution of such problems as education, employment, and housing construction.

WORKS

De Malthus à Mao Tsé-Toung. Paris, 1958.
Le Plan Sauvy. Paris, 1960.
Malthus el les deux Marxs. Paris, 1963.
Mythologie de notre temps. Paris, 1965.

REFERENCE

Marksistskaia i burzhuaznaia sotsiologiia segodnia. Moscow, 1964. Pages 7–60.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ce faisant, il s'agit de depasser les approches traditionnelles mesurant la richesse nationale par le seul indicateur du PIB, lequel ne retient que les flux monetaires et dont l'Economiste demographe Alfred Sauvy (suite a Keynes) a montre deja les limites en prononcant la boutade suivante: [beaucoup moins que]Epousez votre femme de menage et vous ferez baisser le PIB[beaucoup plus grand que]
Provision of meals elaborated in direct management at the premises of the ime "soleil des pyrnes" (7 avenue alfred sauvy, 66100 perpignan) with a chef made available by the subcontractor who will supervise the current team.
Throughout, Nord identifies key figures like the first head of the Plan Jean Monnet, the demographer Alfred Sauvy, and the architect of social security Pierre Laroque, reconstructs their ideological formation and traces their social, professional and political trajectories from the 1930s through the 1950s.
Alfred Sauvy, who coined the term Third World, once wrote: "Like the third estate, theThird World is nothing, and wants to be something.
De acuerdo con la Wikipedia, el termino tercer mundo fue acunado por el economista frances Alfred Sauvy en 1952, para designar a los paises que no pertenecian a ninguno de los 2 bloques enfrentados en la Guerra Fria, el bloque occidental (Estados Unidos, Europa Occidental, Japon, Canada, Australia y sus aliados) y el bloque comunista (Union Sovietica, Europa Oriental, China).
The year 1952 also saw the first reference to the "Third World" by the French demographer Alfred Sauvy.
La these << gerontocratique >> developpee notamment par Alfred Sauvy, avec la population n est pas verifiee ou plutot n est plus verifiee.
El geografo frances Alfred Sauvy habia acunado el termino tercer mundo--tiers monde, en frances--al publicar un articulo titulado <<Tres mundos, un planeta>>, en la revista francesa L'Observateur, (1) en la que establecia un paralelismo entre los <<tres mundos>> y los tres Estados de la Revolucion Francesa--nobleza, clero y pueblo llano--.
THE TERM 'THIRD WORLD' WAS COINED in August 1952 by the French demographer Alfred Sauvy in the left-wing magazine L'Observateur.
In 1952, the French demographer, Alfred Sauvy [1952] coined a new phrase Third World, similar to the historical French third estate, to describe the development problems of the newly emerging nations vis-a-vis first world countries of western, democratic, industrialized nations, the second world of the communist nations, and the third world made up of newly emerging nations that had been former colonies of western Europe and the United States.
Will they become what the French demographer Alfred Sauvy, commenting on the future of the West, describes as a "society of old people, living in old houses, ruminating about old ideas"?
Meanwhile, a French demographer-economist sociologist, Alfred Sauvy (1956), suggested calling these underprivileged new countries.