Schnittke

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Schnittke

Alfred. 1934--98, Russian composer: his works include four symphonies, four violin concertos, choral, chamber, and film music
References in periodicals archive ?
Place the following next to one another: Tchaikovsky's Symphony Pathetique and Alfred Schnittke's cantata Seid nuchtern und wachet.
Among them were - Alfred Schnittke, Kurt Masur, Gideon Kramer and others.
Alfred Schnittke's String Quartet no.3 has previously been performed here, but even more memorable was his harrowing Piano Quintet, given in Bromsgrove Concerts' old home at the Spadesbourne Hall some years ago.
We could not expect to find an equally overt set of spiritual claims to be attached by Alfred Schnittke to his compositions.
The spoofing started things off: Alfred Schnittke's polystyle sendup "Moz-Art for two violins" in a splendidly hammy rendering by Peter Sulski (a WCMS founder) and Rohan Gregory.
The Freddy Kempf Piano Trio no longer play together, but before they disbanded they recorded the two Piano Trios of Shostakovich and that of Alfred Schnittke. This he arranged from his string trio, so, although the piano is less spectacular than it might have been, this is one of the composer's pieces which has audience appeal, and the CD on the BIS label, is a success.
The compendium includes eminent composers from the United States, such as John Adams, David del Tredici, and Ned Rorem, along with well known names from other countries, such as Iannis Xenakis, Luigi Dallapic cola, and Alfred Schnittke. The expected appear side by side with the unexpected, such as Peter Schickele (better known as PDQ Bach) and alternative rocker Elvis Costello.
Leander premiered Alfred Schnittke's Concerto for piano in Mannheim, Germany and sixty other cities throughout Europe.
While music selections from Kayhan Kalhor, Edgar Meyer; Alfred Schnittke and Olivier Messaen elevate pic, an original song by Gene Scheer (sung by Norah Jones) is pure hooey.
Hans Joachim Kreutzer's Faust: Mythos und Musikis, by contrast, a relatively slender compilation of eight distinct chapters that proceed from the Faust Book of 1587 to musical compositions by Louis Spohr, Robert Schumann, and Hector Berlioz, via Charles Gounod and Arrigo Boito, right down to Alfred Schnittke. The book is packed with interesting asides and thoughtful comments that make it ideal reading for the relative novice.
Shostakovich, Dmitri: Chamber Symphony; Alfred Schnittke: Concerto for Piano and Strings.