Alfred the Great


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Related to Alfred the Great: Edward the Confessor

Alfred the Great

849--99, king of Wessex (871--99) and overlord of England, who defeated the Danes and encouraged learning and writing in English

Alfred the Great

 

Born circa 849; died circa 900. King of Wessex from 871.

Under Alfred the Great, the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms were consolidated around Wessex, the army was reorganized, a considerable fleet was built, and a number of fortresses were erected. As a result of the stubborn struggle against the Danes, Alfred the Great acquired authority over southwestern England about 886. The code of law that was compiled under him was the first all-English collection of laws. Making use of earlier Anglo-Saxon laws, Alfred the Great incorporated into them new decrees specifically designed to strengthen the relations of the vassalage and large land-holdings. Under Alfred measures were taken to develop education and culture. The beginning of the compilation of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is usually attributed to the time of Alfred the Great.

REFERENCES

Plummer, C. The Life and Times of Alfred the Great. Oxford, 1902.
Duckett, E. S. Alfred the Great and His England. London, 1957.
References in periodicals archive ?
But he certainly deserves to be known as Alfred the Great.
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It was even translated into English by King Alfred the Great in the ninth century.
The later bishop of Winchester spent his early years in that same town in the court of King Aethelstan (924-39), who--sharing the enthusiasm of his grandfather, Alfred the Great (d.
The Will and Testament of King Alfred the Great also appears to give evidence that a priest might be a slave, which is surely taking the Christian principle of "the equality of believers" pretty far.
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Klingelhofer and his search for Alfred the Great, England's first King, whose remains are as elusive and as sought-after as the Holy Grail itself.
A variety of walking tours are available from the tourist information office (of particular interest to history buffs is one which charts the final journey of King Alfred the Great, who rebuilt the city after the Dark Ages), but we chose to explore on our own.