Algonkian


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Related to Algonkian: Algonquian language

Algonkian

[al′gäŋ·kē·ən] Proterozoic
References in periodicals archive ?
During the 19t century, the Arapahoe, like many of the Northern tribes were a nomadic people chasing buffalo on the Great Plains, but in earlier times, like the Cheyenne, they were Algonkian speaking Woodlands people living in the Great Lakes area.
"Powwow" is an Algonkian word that early Euro-American explorers associated with the healing rituals of shamans.
Speck and illustrated in his work on Northeast Algonkian art [1914].
Finally, Cowdrey cautioned, that "A First principle of Algonkian cosmological thinking, which is scrupulously followed in the use of 'Sacred' designs, is that since the two realms are equally powerful, it is always wise to acknowledge both, so that neither might become offended." (Cowdrey 2009).
Among the Cree and Ojibwa, Algonkian groups of central Canada,
Neither wholly Algonkian nor wholly European, crafted by people from both cultural traditions to meet only partially overlapping needs, the middle ground emerged as a reasonably predictable vehicle for intercultural exchanges.
Bailey, Alfred Goldsworthy 1937 The Conflict of European and Eastern Algonkian Culture, 1504-1700.
(19) Richard Preston, "The Witiko: Algonkian Knowledge and Whiteman Knowledge," in Manlike Monsters on Trial: Early Records and Modern Evidence (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 1980), 126-127; Lou Marano (1982, 386).
Thoreau learned about Native American culture and language, studying an Abenaki-English dictionary and through his work on exhibit at the Concord Museum, I discover the original, Native American name for the river in Concord was an Algonkian word "Musketaquid," translated as "grass ground river."
"The Family Hunting Band as the Basis of Algonkian Social Organization." American Anthropologist 17 (2): 289-305.
In New France, where Native Americans continued to outnumber whites throughout the seventeenth century, as late as 1664 the governing council was reluctant to prosecute an Algonkian Indian who had raped the wife of a colonist (see Nash, Red, White, & Black, 35).