Algonkian


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Related to Algonkian: Algonquian language

Algonkian

[al′gäŋ·kē·ən] Proterozoic
References in periodicals archive ?
The volume's front cover bears George Catlin's famous portrait of Plains Ojibwa chief Shacopay (The Six), and the book opens with an introduction to the Ojibwa in pre-contact times, their territory, close linguistic and cultural relations with their neighbors, the Ottawa (Odawa), Potawatomi, and other Algonkians.
The first chapter, "Old Worlds," furnishes brief surveys of the beliefs and practices surrounding death among the major groups meeting in Northeastern North America: Algonkian Indians, English Protestants, French Catholics, Akan Africans and Western European Jews.
Greenblatt suggests that Hal's desire to control his future subjects by acquiring their language is an analogous process to Harriot's attempt to understand Algonkian culture.
Albanese first introduced the term in her 1990 study, Nature Religion in America: From the Algonkian Indians to the New Age (Chicago: University of Chicago Press).
Bailey's summary of the debate in The Conflict of European and Eastern Algonkian Cultures, 1504-1700: A Study in Canadian Civilization (Toronto 1969), xviii-xxii.
Verizon has added a new cell site in Sterling, Loudoun County, increasing coverage and capacity along Algonkian Pkwy.
The hibernating woodchuck, named from Algonkian Cree wuchak or weejak, is a lowly marmot and couldn't beaver down a birch if its life depended on deforesting Eden.
Earthshapers and Placemakers: Algonkian Indian Stories and the Landscape.
The now English words in my list derive in fact from Spanish, Arabic, Nahuatl, Japanese, Algonkian, Sanskrit, and Hawaiian.
Like them, it uses carefully edited ethnographic detail--in particular the Manabozho legends of the Algonkian peoples recorded by Schoolcraft to build up a picture of a Native American society on the eve of colonization.