Algonquian

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Related to Algonquians: Iroquois, Algonquins

Algonquian

(ălgŏng`kēən, –kwēən), branch of the Algonquian-Wakashan linguistic family of North America. See Native American languagesNative American languages,
languages of the native peoples of the Western Hemisphere and their descendants. A number of the Native American languages that were spoken at the time of the European arrival in the New World in the late 15th cent.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In lesser hands, interpreting the dreams of Puritans and eastern Algonquian people might degenerate into fiction.
The political relations amongst Virginia Algonquians located in different geographies also support the idea of disunity in the immediate precontact period.
Algonquian and Iroquoian peoples, and Inuit, also helped the early Europeans survive.
Dewdney argued that the pictographs, like the other images created by the Algonquians on wood, birch bark, and hide were all forms of expression (ibid.:22) that he subdivided into three categories: secular, tutorial, and visionary.
Perhaps this is a point of which Hariot was uneasily aware when he wrote his reports about the Algonquians from Virginia.
Brightman, Conservation and Resource Depletion: The Case of the Boreal Forest Algonquians, in The Question of the Common, supra note 15, at 121, 129 (finding that technology "significantly lowered costs of pursuit and capture and increased rates of capture" of game in one Native American tribe).
The second details the sophisticated culture of contact-era Algonquians in coastal North Carolina and Virginia and their early interactions with the English.
Many were Virginia Algonquians, Mohawks, Cherokees, and Creeks, whose trips were sponsored by colonial corporations or governments.
Algonquians attacked the settlement in 1571, killing the missionaries and halting Spanish efforts at colonization in the region (Lewis and Loomie 1953).
The book opens with Arthur Barlowe's account of the sharing of food at Roanoke in 1584 between the English and Algonquians, which is read as a successful political negotiation.
Where the Algonquians of White's tale dealt with imperial power on the basis of trade, the Six Nations faced a burgeoning American population and an army Of speculators committed to taking their land.