Ibn al-Haytham

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Ibn al-Haytham

(ĭb`ən äl-hīth-äm`) or

Alhazen

(ălhəzĕn`), 965–c.1040, Arab mathematician. Ibn al-Haytham was born in Basra, but made his career in Cairo, where he supported himself copying scientific manuscripts. Among his original works, only those on optics, astronomy, and mathematics survive. His Optics, which relied on experiment rather than on past authority, introduced the idea that light rays emanate in straight lines in all directions from every point on a luminous surface. Latin editions of the Optics, available from the 13th cent. on, influenced Kepler and Descartes. As a cosmologist, al-Haytham tried to find mechanisms by which the heavenly bodies might be shown to follow the paths determined by Ptolemaic mathematics. In mathematics, al-Haytham elucidated and extended Euclid's Elements and suggested a proof of the parallel postulate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scattered among the remains were copies of the Quran, as well as the small blackboards that young Quranic students use to copy verses, Alhacen said.
Sometimes a mother and children, but some lone children too," Alhacen said.
28) En el mundo arabe, Alhacen (siglo X) habia ya reconocido el papel protagonico de la longitud de nuestros brazos en el campo visual para referir la construccion completa de la percepcion de distancias espaciales.
It is this very tradition and thrust that provides the historical context for the work of the redoubtable Ibn al-Haytham (Latin Alhacen, d.
Alhacen on image-formation and distortion in mirrors; a critical edition, with English translation and commentary, of book 6 of Alhacen's De Aspectibus; 2v.