Alids


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Alids

 

descendants of Caliph Ali and Fatima. They founded several feudal dynasties in Muslim countries: the Idrisids in the Maghreb, the Sulayman dynasty in Mecca and then in Yemen, and the Sulayman (a different branch) in the Maghreb. Among other dynasties that considered themselves Alids were the Sa’adi dynasty (1525–1659) and the Filali Sharifs in Morocco (after 1664), and elsewhere, the Fatimids in North Africa and Egypt (910–1171), the Zaidites and other branches of the Alids in Tabaristan (864–928), and the Zaidites in Yemen (901–1962).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Despite their kinship with the Alids, the Abbasids mistreated Ali's descendants and the Shias.
Most of their treatment is chronological, describing such stages of the history and Arabia on the eve of Islam, the Prophet's mission in Mecca and Medina, the ummah becomes an Arab kingdom, Alids versus Abbasids and Shi'ites versus Sunnites, and the end of the formative period of Medieval Islam.
It was mounted on behalf of an unspecified claimant, described generally as the "one who would be acceptable" from the Ahl al-Bayt--or from the "People of the House [family] of the Prophet." The family of Ali had a claim to preeminence within this house, and many Shiite sympathizers supported the revolution in the expectation that it would lead to the rule of the Alids. In fact, one of the important leaders of the revolution approached Jaafar As Sadik to proclaim him as caliph.
For instance, the political thought and activities of different sects and groupings are examined historically with reference to the righteous caliphs (khulafa-i rashidun), the Alids, (1) the Kharijites, the Umayyads, the Abbasids, the Mutazilites, the Sunnis, the shiites, the Hadith Party, the Imamis, the Zaydis, and the Ismailis etc.
On Mu'awiya's death in 680, many Sunnis and Shi'ites wanted to restore Ali's dynasty (the Alids) and invited his son Hussein to become caliph; but they failed to back him in an ensuing battle.
Up to that point, the preeminence of the prophet and the four-caliph thesis created a consensus among the community of believers, the umma, despite early signs of dissent, in particular among the 'Alids (followers of the fourth caliph, 'Ali, son-in-law and cousin of the prophet, who became known as the Shi'is).
D, presents the genealogical tables of the Quraysh, the Ummayads of Damascus and Cordova, the Abbasids, and the Alids. In addition, there is a useful chronology spanning the years 516 to 2001.
AN ambitious, alids production of Our Day Out could have been the banana skin that led to an embarrassing slip-up by Maverick Theatre.
Madelung, "Abu Ishaq al-Sabi on the Alids of Tabaristan and Gilan," Journal of Near Eastern Studies 26 (1967): 17-21.
On Mu'awiya's death in 680, many Muslims (both Sunnis and Shiites) wanted to restore Ali's dynasty (the Alids) and thus invited his son, Hussein, to become caliph; but they failed to support him in the ensuing crisis.
without opposition.(4) As Caliph, al-Mahdi made it a priority to reconcile the 'Alids who could potentially serve as leaders of an opposition.
For Sunni Islam, however, there were limits to the continued use of his image as a potent patriarch, not least because it might offend the parallel prestige of the 'Alids and their claim to a closer kinship with the Prophet.