Alismatales


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Alismatales

[ə‚liz·mə′tā·lēz]
(botany)
A small order of flowering plants in the subclass Alismatidae, including aquatic and semiaquatic herbs.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, considering the most recent phylogeny, Limnobiophyllum must be now included in Lemnoideae of Araceae and within Alismatales.
Amborellales 1 1 Nymphaeales 3 2 Austrobaileyales 3 2 Chloranthales 1 1 Magnoliids Cannellales 2 Piperales 5 3 Laurales 7 2 1 Magnoliales 6 3 1 Monocots Acorales 1 Alismatales 13 2 Petrosaviales 1 Dioscoreales 5 2 Pandanales 5 2 Liliales 10 4 Asparagales (incl.
The latest classification system (known as APG system: Angiosperm Phelogeny Group system), of the families and orders of the flowering plants which based largely on DNA sequences of the chloroplast, nuclear ribosomal, and mitochondrial genes, In this system the order Alismatales put in monocot clad (Fig.
Orden: Alismatales Familia: Araceae Subfamilia: Aroideae
was separated from this cluster for the reason that it belongs to Alismatales, a root order of monocots [27, 28].
Potamogetonaceae is a small subcosmopolitan monocot family of aquatic herbs with submersed or floating leaves, belonging to the order Alismatales (Haynes and Holm-Nielsen, 2003).
Among Alismatales, many Araceae (including Lemnaceae) have unicarpellate flowers (also the basal genus Gymnostachys; Buzgo, 2001), and some have unistaminate flowers (Mayo et al.
Of the Angiospermae, Poales exhibited the highest number of taxa (40), followed by Alismatales (17), Myrtales and Lamiales (12 species each).
These occur in Alismatales (or Alismatidae) mostly.
ALISMATALES Araceae Amorphophallus albispathus Hett.
As a result of more intensive sampling and analysis of a larger data set, both in molecular and combined molecular-morphological studies, additional groups, most prominently Tofieldiaceae, Araceae, and other families of Alismatales sensu Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (APG, 1998), came into focus as comparatively basal taxa and separated as the next clade (after Acorus) from the remainder of monocots (Chase et al.