mineral water

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mineral water

mineral water, spring water containing various mineral salts, especially the carbonates, chlorides, phosphates, silicates, sulfides, and sulfates of calcium, iron, lithium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, and other metals. Various gases may also be present, e.g., carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, nitrogen, and inert gases. Ordinary well or spring water, in contrast, contains far fewer substances, mostly dissolved sulfates and carbonates, and calcium and other alkali and alkaline earth metals. Many mineral waters also contain trace elements that are thought to have therapeutic value. Spa therapy, widely practiced in Europe, advocates bathing in and drinking mineral waters as a cure for a variety of diseases. Many authorities believe that the success of such therapy really results from the beneficial effects of rest and relaxation. Famous European resorts include Bath, Spa, Aix-les-Bains, Aachen, Baden-Baden, and Karlovy Vary (Carlsbad). Prominent among resorts in the United States are Poland, Maine; Saratoga Springs, N.Y.; Berkeley Springs and White Sulphur Springs, W.Va.; Hot Springs, Ark.; French Lick, Ind.; Waukesha, Wis.; and Las Vegas Hot Springs, N.Mex. Many mineral waters are now prepared synthetically, the various mineral ingredients being added to ordinary water in proportions determined by careful chemical analysis of the original ingredients. See spring.

Mineral Wells

Mineral Wells, city (1990 pop. 14,870), Palo Pinto and Parker counties, N Tex.; inc. 1882. Aluminum products, bottled mineral water, clothing, and pharmaceuticals are produced, and there is gas processing. The mineral water made this hill city a popular health resort in the late 19th and early 20th cent., and oil activity in the area also spurred the city's growth. To the east is Lake Mineral Wells, a reservoir in the Trinity River system.
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mineral water

[′min·rəl ‚wȯd·ər]
(hydrology)
Water containing naturally or artificially supplied minerals or gases.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mineral water

water containing dissolved mineral salts or gases, usually having medicinal properties
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Chandler, AZ, September 23, 2016 --(PR.com)-- Optimal Harmony Water Company announces the launch of AQUA OH-!, a revolutionary new approach to the alkaline water market.
In alkaline waters, ion loss probably occur due to an inhibition of branchial [Na.sup.+]/[H.sup.+] and [Cl.sup.-]/ HC[O.sub.3] exchangers (PARRA & BALDISSEROTTO, 2007), which would explain the lower plasma Cllevels in pirapitinga at pH 10.0 and 10.5.
Dietary NaCl supplementation is not effective to increase silver catfish growth in neutral and alkaline waters, but improves growth in juveniles exposed to acidic pH.
Water get much of its taste from its pH balance: acidic waters have a sour note, while alkaline waters are slightly bitter and low alkaline waters seem slightly sweet.
Still puzzling to Thompson, however, is why the extremozyme survives alkaline waters better than its mammalian counterparts do.