alkene

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alkene

(ăl`kēn), any of a group of aliphatic hydrocarbons whose molecules contain one or more carbon-carbon double bonds (see chemical bondchemical bond,
mechanism whereby atoms combine to form molecules. There is a chemical bond between two atoms or groups of atoms when the forces acting between them are strong enough to lead to the formation of an aggregate with sufficient stability to be regarded as an
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). Alkenes with only one double bond have the general formula CnH2n. In the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) system of chemical nomenclature, the name of an alkene is derived from the name of the corresponding alkanealkane
, any of a group of aliphatic hydrocarbons whose molecules contain only single bonds (see chemical bond). Alkanes have the general chemical formula CnH2n+2.
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 by replacing the -ane alkane suffix with -ene and, if necessary, adding a prefix to indicate the location of the double bond in the molecule. The IUPAC name of the simplest alkene, H2C=CH2, is ethene, which is derived from ethane. Propene is related to propane. Two alkenes, 1-butene and 2-butene, are related to butane; these two compounds, which differ in the location of the double bond in their molecules, are structural isomersisomer
, in chemistry, one of two or more compounds having the same molecular formula but different structures (arrangements of atoms in the molecule). Isomerism is the occurrence of such compounds. Isomerism was first recognized by J. J. Berzelius in 1827.
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. In addition to these IUPAC names, many of the alkenes have common names, e.g., ethene is called ethylene and propene propylene. The alkenes as a group are sometimes called the ethylene series. Since the carbon-carbon double bond is sometimes called an olefinic linkage, the alkenes are sometimes called the olefins. Many of the reactions in which alkenes take part involve the cleavage of half the carbon-carbon double bond and subsequent formation of two single bonds, one to each of the adjacent carbon atoms. Such reactions include hydrogenation, with the formation of an alkane, and hydration, with the formation of an alcohol.

alkene

[′al‚kēn]
(organic chemistry)
One of a class of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons containing one or more carbon-to-carbon double bonds.

alkene

a. any unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbon with the general formula CnH2n
b. (as modifier): alkene series
References in periodicals archive ?
The results for the alkanes, alkenes and aromatic fuel candidates are shown collectively in Figures 7-9.
When the temperature and relative humidity were held steady, the percentage of arenes increased as the ratio of air exchange rate-to-loading factor increased, but the percentage of alkenes and of aldehydes and ketones decreased at the same rate as this ratio increased (Fig.
Partially poisoned catalysts were extended for the hydrogenation of alkynes to alkenes.
Noyori in Japan (14),(15) reported highly catalytic and selective hydrogenation of alkenes, especially allyllically heterofunctional alkenes.
1] of OC) was also enriched in pyrogenic SOM with a high contribution of BN markers, and in an aliphatic component with particularly high contributions of branched alkenes from an aliphatic SOM fraction, possibly in part pyrogenic.
3] is not effective at removing VOCs except alkenes, a reaction of [O.
Cycloaddition reactions have proved to be the most powerful and successful reactions to construct these ring systems rapidly; while the acid-catalyzed imino Diels-Alder reaction (Povarov reaction) between 2-azadienes and electron-rich alkenes in its three-component version is one of the most powerful synthetic tools for the construction of nitrogen-containing six-membered heterocyclic compounds, including tetrahydroquinolines (Kouznetsov 2009, Glushkov et al.
ACR is a three-carbon [alpha], [beta]-unsaturated carbonyl derivative and is a member of a large chemical class known as type-2 alkenes (LoPachin et al.
To illustrate metathesis, he used slides of color-coded dancers representing different alkenes (a specific type of chemical compound) and catalysts (substances that increase the rate of a chemical reaction) that switch dancing partners, producing new substances.
These short-lived molecules form in the Earth's atmosphere when ozone reacts with organic compounds called alkenes.
Double carbon bonds are common in alkenes which is a component of petroleum.
In scientists' view, a group of chemicals called type-2 alkenes, which are widespread in both the environment and the brains of Alzheimer's patients, act as major drivers of the disease.