Alkonost


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Alkonost

 

a fairy-tale bird with a human face, depicted on Old-Russian popular prints. According to an ancient Greek myth, Halcyone, the wife of Ceyx, threw herself into the sea when she learned of his death and was turned into a bird which was named halcyon (kingfisher) after her. The word alkonost entered the Russian language through a distortion of the Old-Russian saying “Alkion est’ ptitsa” (Halcyon is a bird).

References in periodicals archive ?
The jewellery piece aesthetically marries Russian folklore with works of the revivalist artist Victor Vasnetsov, particularly the painting, Sirin and Alkonost The birds of Joy and Sorrow.
Sirin and Alkonost features two legendary half bird half woman creatures.
When the Correspondence appeared a year later in the almanac Alkonost, it was received as a twilight witness to the passing genius of the old intelligentsia and their "eternal questions" about God and the ultimate ends of history.