Bloom, Allan David

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Bloom, Allan David

(1936–92) political scientist, author; born in Indianapolis, Ind. Educated at the University of Chicago, he joined the Chicago liberal arts faculty in 1955, moved on to Cornell and the University of Toronto (1963–79), and returned to Chicago in 1979 to teach political philosophy. He remained an obscure translator of Plato until the publication of his Closing of the American Mind (1987), a neoconservative polemic against what he perceived as the politicization of academia and the decline of liberal education in the Western tradition.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, although these critiques tend to view the so-called academic culture wars of the 1980s and 1990s as the wellspring of the neoliberal university--and consider supposedly traditionalistic culture warriors such as Allan Bloom to be particularly at fault--we shall see that neoliberalism's influence began much earlier.
"Animals have sex and human beings have eros, and no accurate science is possible without making this distinction," Allan Bloom observed.
The conservative American writer Allan Bloom presciently warned in the early 1990s against the triumphalist conviction that liberal capitalism had buried fascism and totalitarianism.
Allan Bloom, author of The Closing of the American Mind (1987), would be ashamed.]]>
Hirsch is quite sound as far as he goes; yet while Allan Bloom joked publicly about being confused with him, he sneered privately that such confusion could be possible.
In your book, you reference Allan Bloom's Closing of the American Mind, and his claim that most universities today don't seem capable of articulating what students should learn.
In "The Crisis of Liberal Education," Allan Bloom (disclosure: Bloom, whom Lazere attacks, was my teacher) argued that universities should preserve for students serious and neglected alternative accounts of the best way of life.
Drawing heavily from Allan Bloom's seminal work The Closing of the American Mind, the aforementioned Professor Kilpatrick explores this ego factor brilliantly in Why Johnny Can't Tell Right From Wrong.
Through an analysis of John Locke and of Allan Bloom's edition of Emile on the one hand and the work that went into the definitive edition of the Correspondance de Rousseau, edited by Ralph Leigh, on the other, Wokler explores the scholarly vagaries and pitfalls connected to working with manuscripts.
On the most general level, it can be read as a counterpiece to Allan Bloom's The Closing of the American Mind.
Debaters have included the critic Allan Bloom, Nobel Prize-winning economist Milton Friedman, famed modern Jewish philosopher Leo Strauss, and countless other brilliant minds with apparently too much time on their hands.