Bloom, Allan David

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Bloom, Allan David

(1936–92) political scientist, author; born in Indianapolis, Ind. Educated at the University of Chicago, he joined the Chicago liberal arts faculty in 1955, moved on to Cornell and the University of Toronto (1963–79), and returned to Chicago in 1979 to teach political philosophy. He remained an obscure translator of Plato until the publication of his Closing of the American Mind (1987), a neoconservative polemic against what he perceived as the politicization of academia and the decline of liberal education in the Western tradition.
References in periodicals archive ?
Animals have sex and human beings have eros, and no accurate science is possible without making this distinction," Allan Bloom observed.
The conservative American writer Allan Bloom presciently warned in the early 1990s against the triumphalist conviction that liberal capitalism had buried fascism and totalitarianism.
Allan Bloom, author of The Closing of the American Mind (1987), would be ashamed.
THE STATE OF THE AMERICAN MIND, A collection of 16 essays edited by Mark Bauerlein and Adam Bellow, boldly announces its descent from The Closing of the American Mind, which appeared in 1987 and made Allan Bloom the world's most famous professor, for an extended run.
In "The Crisis of Liberal Education," Allan Bloom (disclosure: Bloom, whom Lazere attacks, was my teacher) argued that universities should preserve for students serious and neglected alternative accounts of the best way of life.
Debaters have included the critic Allan Bloom, Nobel Prize-winning economist Milton Friedman, famed modern Jewish philosopher Leo Strauss, and countless other brilliant minds with apparently too much time on their hands.
Among such heirs, no one is more prominent than Allan Bloom.
Twenty-five years later, Allan Bloom would mine a similar vein to produce his bestseller, The Closing of the American Mind.
Among those later writers who would criticize the academy's displacement of capitalism was Allan Bloom.
WHENEVER it enters my mind, as it often does, the name of Allan Bloom evokes, first of all, a memory of laughter.
Allan Bloom, a classicist by training, explains in his introduction why he found it counterproductive for non-Western perspectives to get a place in liberal arts curriculum, by tracing the root of America's post-Vietnam malaise back to Rousseau (my italics):