Allecto


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Allecto

one of the three Furies, vengeful deities who punish evil-doers. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 274]
See: Anger
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En second lieu, la position spatiale des deux Dirae, stationnant pres du trone du Jupiter, entre en contradiction avec les livres VI et VII, ou Allecto et Tisiphone resident dans les Enfers et sont explicitement designees comme des creatures stygiennes : elles occupent les chambres de fer (ferrei thalami VI, 273-80) ou le sejour infernal (sedes VII, 324, VII, 562).
Une amphore depeint Oreste a Delphes poursuivi par deux Furies, Megere et Allecto (LIMC, Erinys no.
Edgeworth (entre Megere et les Dirae d'une part, et le groupe des Furies Allecto et Tisiphone d'autre part), ne tient pas.
De fait, Dirae et Furiae sont presque systematiquement associees au seuil dans l'Eneide, dans un emploi quasi formulaire qui nocculte pas la valeur religieuse mais au contraire la renforce: Didon est accablee par les avertissements terribles des propheties et par ses reves, et son delire est compare a celui d'Oreste poursuivi par les Dirae : ultricesque sedent in limine Dirae (IV, 473) ; dans le vestibule des Enfers, la chambre des Eumenides est sur le seuil : VI, 279: in limine bellum ferreique Eumenidum thalami; Allecto assiege le seuil d'Amata : tacitumque obsedit limen Amatae (VII, 343).
In being frozen with fear, the Duke of Suffolk is thus like Turnus, who is terrified of Allecto and who will ironically face death at the end of Virgil's epic.
In the Aeneid, Turnus' speech to Drances recalls his earlier encounter with Allecto, where his limbs were frozen with fear for good reason.
While Thomson points to this passage as possibly being related to Suffolk's words, Virgil is more likely suggesting that Aeneas will soon look upon the home of Allecto, and that he is filled with fear, much as Turnus will be when the Fury visits him in the form of the seer Calybe.
Circe, then, prefigures Allecto as a symbol of the violent emotions which threaten to overcome reason and reduce man to the level of the beasts.
27) The torch thrown by Allecto corresponds to the fiery soul in Lucretius;(28) but Turnus has no chance to resist once Allecto takes on her true shape.
Turnus' transformation by Allecto parallels Circe's more literal transformations at the beginning of the book, and is in turn mirrored in the story of Io, depicted on his shield at the end of the book.
Both are in a sense victims of Juno or of their own passions, like the persecuted Io or the love-maddened bulls; Aeneas may or may not be justified in killing Turnus (by his own lights, or according to the standard of behaviour suggested by Anchises in his famous exhortation to `spare the humble and crush the proud', or the ideology of Augustan Rome(40); but it must be significant that the action is carried out in the frame of mind which has been characteristic of Turnus since his encounter with Allecto in book 7.
As for Venus's call for the fashioning of arms, it is not the anarchic call of "woman as a troublemaker" (a role ascribed to Venus herself as she summons the Lemnian women to manslaughter in the second book of Valerius Flaccus's Argonautica), but is uttered in the hope of protecting the male victim of an irrational, female instigation of armed conflict (without Juno and Allecto the pact between Aeneas and Latinus would not have been disrupted).