Allegheny Observatory


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Allegheny Observatory

An observatory sited in Riverview Park, in the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, and operated by the Physics and Astronomy Department of the University of Pittsburgh. Founded in 1859, the observatory was taken over by the university in 1867 and was fully established on its present site by 1912. The observatory has three telescopes housed in three separate domes. The Fitz-Clark Refractor, a 33.02-centimeter instrument, was the observatory's original telescope, purchased in 1861; it has a focal length of 4.62 meters and a focal ratio of f/14. The William Thaw Memorial Refractor (aperture 76.2 cm, focal length 14.3 m, focal ratio f/18.8) was built in 1912 and designed for photographic work. In 1985 its object lens was upgraded to focus red light, a region of the spectrum in which the Pittsburgh skies are still relatively clear. The James E. Keeler Memorial Reflector (aperture 73.7 cm, focal length 4.56 m, focal ratio f/6) is the observatory's main instrument. Built in 1905 as a Cassegrain telescope, it was originally used for spectroscopy. In 1992 its mirrors were replaced with ones made from a Russian version of Cer-Vit and its optics were upgraded to an f/15 Ritchey–Chrétien system (see Ritchey–Chrétien optics). Among the observatory's other instruments is a nulti-channel astrometric photometer (MAP), designed by George A. Gatewood, the institution's director from 1977. The Allegheny Observatory is today a world leader in high-precision astrometry. Its measurements are being used most significantly in the search for extrasolar planetary systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other prominent astronomers flooding to the eclipse path were Allegheny Observatory director and solar astronomer Samuel Pierpont Langley, who climbed the 14,000-foot Pikes Peak to obtain the best possible views of the corona.
The video came from a NASA camera located at Allegheny Observatory near Pittsburg, PA.
Pittsburgh, PA, July 27, 2012 --(PR.com)-- "Mom, I want to be an astrophysicist!" is what a pleased mother of a twelve-year-old son heard after seeing the film UNDAUNTED: The Forgotten Giants of the Allegheny Observatory. This just-released film on DVD tells the untold stories behind both the birth of astrophysics and the invention of flight, and the fascinating personalities behind those remarkable achievements.
[ClickPress, Wed Jul 25 2012] "Mom, I want to be an astrophysicist!" is what a pleased mother of a twelve-year-old son heard after seeing the film UNDAUNTED: The Forgotten Giants of the Allegheny Observatory. This just-released film on DVD tells the untold stories behind both the birth of astrophysics and the invention of flight, and the fascinating personalities behind those remarkable achievements.
The American astronomer and aviation pioneer Samuel Pierpont Langley (1834-1906), director of the Allegheny Observatory, spotted the planet seconds before it entered onto the solar disk on 1878 May 6.
Gatewood of the University of Pittsburgh's Allegheny Observatory, and Inwoo Han of the Korea Astronomy Observatory in Kyung-Book.
Gatewood, director of the University of Pittsburgh's Allegheny Observatory, announced the tentative findings at a meeting of the American Astronomical Association in Madison, Wis.
His exalted descriptions of what he saw in his scopes were what attracted me to 1001 Celestial Wonders when I first saw a copy in the Allegheny Observatory library in Pittsburgh over half a century ago.
Gatewood, director of the University of Pittsburgh's Allegheny Observatory, announced the tentative results this week at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Madison, Wis.
We turned over prints of lightning photographed by Brashear in June 1894, the company's exhibit at the World's Columbian Exposition dated 1892, Brashear's famous spectrograph attached to the tailpiece of the 30-inch Thaw refractor at Allegheny Observatory, and more.
Castelaz of the University of Pittsburgh's Allegheny Observatory decided to investigate further.
Proper motion (RA) = +0.239[4.sup.s] per year Proper motion (Dec.) = -3.812" per year Parallax = 0.250" These can be compared to the results recently announced by Allegheny Observatory in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, based on CCD observations made with the 0.76-meter Thaw refractor (see www.pitt.edu/~aobsvtry/teegarden.html):

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