Parable of the Cave

(redirected from Allegory of the cave)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Parable of the Cave

cave dwellers see only the shadows of reality. [Gk. Phil.: Republic]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The menhirs represent humanity's early religious aspirations, maybe also playing the role of the carvings in Plato's allegory of the cave, whose shadows are cast upon the wall.
But one class I really enjoyed was Philosophy 101, where we talked about ideas like Plato's Allegory of the Cave.
From there, Jordan led a discussion that touched on Plato's Allegory of the Cave, student debt, cultural appropriation and white privilege.
The work's title presumably invokes the Allegory of the Cave from Plato's Republic, wherein the philosopher differentiates between shadow and substance.
In light of Plato's allegory of the cave, Merkouris considers an article of the 1969 Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties that calls for international obligations to be interpreted by reference to their normative environment.
The most famous section is Plato's Allegory of the Cave, in which he discusses the effect of education and the role of the philosopher.
According to Plato's famous allegory of the cave, only a few human beings ever come to know themselves in such a way, for escaping from the cave is a difficult undertaking involving arduous studies.
An ode to the process of finding oneself in the fray of love and loss that is early adulthood, The Drunken Spelunker's Guide to Plato plays out the Allegory of the Cave through the medium of booze joints and barstool intellectuals.
And for a moment, let's return to the ancient Greeks and the Allegory of the Cave in which Plato describes emerging out of the cave into the brilliant light of the sun, it's luminance blinding--a metaphor for how once we know the truth, we will forever be blinded to the untruths we used to believe.
They draw a parallel to Plato's allegory of the cave, in which prisoners spend their lives seeing only the flickering shadows cast by a fire on a cavern wall.
Reading Plato s Meno and the Republic's allegory of the cave in the context of a service-learning classroom involves students in a drama urging them to become self-conscious participants in the active pedagogy of the class.
There are certain texts, however, that make every syllabus, including Plato's Allegory of the Cave.