Parable of the Cave

(redirected from Allegory of the cave)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Parable of the Cave

cave dwellers see only the shadows of reality. [Gk. Phil.: Republic]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
From Plato using the 'allegory of the cave' to depict the human condition to Gollum lurking in subterranean streams, the archetype of the cave is so ingrained in our cultures that most of us can imagine what it feels to be trapped inside one.
For Plato, the great advocate for Universal Free Education based on ability not any other limit, had in the allegory of the cave mimicked society as born and imprisoned in the cave of ignorance.
Notably, both were familiar with Plato's allegory of the cave, and both tackled similar issues about the nature of created reality and the place of man within it--but came to vastly different conclusions about what that place is and about what that knowledge can do to a person.
The menhirs represent humanity's early religious aspirations, maybe also playing the role of the carvings in Plato's allegory of the cave, whose shadows are cast upon the wall.
But one class I really enjoyed was Philosophy 101, where we talked about ideas like Plato's Allegory of the Cave.
From there, Jordan led a discussion that touched on Plato's Allegory of the Cave, student debt, cultural appropriation and white privilege.
The work's title presumably invokes the Allegory of the Cave from Plato's Republic, wherein the philosopher differentiates between shadow and substance.
Such use of 'allegory' to illustrate a point about objective reality, which is explicated by the narrator, is comparable to Plato's "Allegory of the cave" (Heidegger, 2002), in particular 'Part One' of that book: Plato's narrator, Socrates, explicitly compares the allegorical situation of prisoners in a cave to the philosophical notion of the conceptualisation of the truth, called the 'unhidden'.
"The Drunken Spelunker's Guide to Plato" is a novel based on Plato's 'Allegory of the Cave' from "The Republic".
In light of Plato's allegory of the cave, Merkouris considers an article of the 1969 Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties that calls for international obligations to be interpreted by reference to their normative environment.
The most famous section is Plato's Allegory of the Cave, in which he discusses the effect of education and the role of the philosopher.
According to Plato's famous allegory of the cave, only a few human beings ever come to know themselves in such a way, for escaping from the cave is a difficult undertaking involving arduous studies.