Allen's rule


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Allen's rule

[′al·ənz ‚rül]
(vertebrate zoology)
The generalization that the protruding parts of a warm-blooded animal's body, such as the tail, ears, and limbs, are shorter in animals from cold parts of the species range than from warm parts.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conversely, the inverse association between the RPL and altitude appears to bear out Allen's rule (1877) that endotherms tend to have shorter appendages in colder climates.
Dr Symonds said Allen's rule has never been tested with this large a group of animals and was more anecdotal.
Rules, as opposed to exceptions, are seen in Bergmann's rule for the size of animal species in their northern range, and Allen's rule for the size of their extremities (Moment, 1967).