hyposensitization

(redirected from Allergy shots)
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hyposensitization

[¦hī·pō‚sen·səd·ə′zā·shən]
(communications)
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Allergy shots used to be the only immunotherapy treatment approved by the U.S.
In the end, you may have to get allergy shots or take some over the counter medications to combat the sneezing.
He does not seem to know that allergy shots are pure homeopathy.
Allergy shots, in use since 1911, stimulate your immune system to fight allergies effectively and, most importantly, naturally.
Depending on your doctor's advice, allergy shots are usually given once or two times per week for a few months, initially.
One of the most reliable ways to treat seasonal allergies linked to pollen is immunotherapy (allergy shots).
It may best be treated by allergy shots, according to researchers.
Either skin testing or bloodwork can be used to diagnose inhalant allergies, and treatment may consist of small, increasing doses of the allergen under the skin over time (immunotherapy, or allergy shots) or medications to decrease itchiness (steroids are often effective, but again, they can have side effects).
The consequence of this can be fatal." Noting that there is no cure for asthma, Dr Abdulsattar said allergy shots and long-term medications can help manage the condition in both adults and children.
Abdulsattar says allergy shots and long-term medications can help manage the condition in both adults and children.
Due to the fires, suffocation cases by dust and smoke took place, Badran said, adding that the injured were rushed to the hospital where they were treated as having asthma cases and given asthma sprays and allergy shots. Within two hours, most of them were fully treated, he added.
It describes the basics of allergies, including the immune system, the respiratory system, testing, allergy shots, medications, and epinephrine injections for allergic reactions; allergy symptoms and complications; food allergies and intolerances, including wheat, nuts, soy, seafood, milk, chocolate, eggs, lactose intolerance, celiac disease, histamine sensitivity, and sulfite sensitivity; common allergy triggers, such as pollen, pets, mold, insects, smoking, dust, and chemicals; and managing allergies in daily life, with information on asthma management, indoor air quality, cosmetics, food labels, dining, working with a dietitian, food diaries, and other advice.