Alliaria


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Alliaria

 

a genus of biennial plants of the family Cruciferae. The leaves are entire; the radical leaves are reniform and longpetioled. The flowers are white and gathered in racemes. The fruit is a capsule. The plants emit a strong garlic odor. There are about five species, distributed in the temperate zone of Eurasia. The USSR has two species. A. petiolata (formerly A. officinalis) grows in shady forests, shrubbery thickets, and in ravines; it also is a weed in parks, orchards, and gardens. The plant is used as a seasoning in place of garlic. The leaves contain vitamin C, and the seeds contain a fatty oil. The seeds can be used as a substitute for mustard. The milk of cows that have eaten A. petiolata acquires a reddish yellow color and a caustic aftertaste.

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Alliaria petiolata plants were collected and reaped at maturity from overshadowed and moist soil near Albertslund golf club, at the roadside of Snubbekorsvej, close to Hoejbakkegaard Alle, Taastrup, Denmark (Taastrup, Denmark, 55[degrees]38'N, 12[degrees]17'E).
maculosa Annual forb Grassland -USA Alliaria petiolata Biennial herb Hardwood Forest, North America Oenothera panciniata Annual herb Coastal sand dune-Japan Sapium sebiferum Perennial tree Hyric forest-USA Solidago canadensis Perennial herb Chongming Island, China.
Each cage contained one female, egg-laying substrate (one leaf of Alliaria petiolata in a bottle of water), and 20% sugar solution, placed several times a day on flowers of Cirsium arvense.
Forest floor plant community response to experimental control of the invasive biennial, Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard).
Alliaria petiolata was the most frequently encountered nonnative, found in seven plots scattered among three sites (Table 2).
Exotic herbaceous plants common to abundant in this field include Alliaria petiolata, Allium vineale, Artemisia vulgaris, Barbarea vulgaris, Brassica nigra, Cirsium arvense, C.
The non-native Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard), a pervasive adventive species of many Illinois sand deposits, was occasionally found in the shaded seep plots (IV of 2.
Alliaria petiolata, Dianthus armeria, Lonicera tatarica, and U.
For example, Alliaria petiolata lines the many trails cutting through this woodland.
Companeras: Alliaria petiolata + en 27; Angelica major r en 26; Arum italicum 1 en 46 y + en 46; Athyrium filix-femina + en 27; Brachypodium pinnatum subsp.