Alliaria


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Alliaria

 

a genus of biennial plants of the family Cruciferae. The leaves are entire; the radical leaves are reniform and longpetioled. The flowers are white and gathered in racemes. The fruit is a capsule. The plants emit a strong garlic odor. There are about five species, distributed in the temperate zone of Eurasia. The USSR has two species. A. petiolata (formerly A. officinalis) grows in shady forests, shrubbery thickets, and in ravines; it also is a weed in parks, orchards, and gardens. The plant is used as a seasoning in place of garlic. The leaves contain vitamin C, and the seeds contain a fatty oil. The seeds can be used as a substitute for mustard. The milk of cows that have eaten A. petiolata acquires a reddish yellow color and a caustic aftertaste.

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The first purpose of our study was to evaluate at multiple scales the relationships between Alliaria petiolata and other plants in an oak woodland in eastern Minnesota in order to determine whether the data are more consistent with A.
Separating effects of allelopathy and shading by Alliaria petiolata and Lonicera maackii on growth, reproduction and survival of Impatiens capensis.
Variation in the expression of chemical defenses in Alliaria petiolata in the field and common garden.
Other plant invaders such as Alliaria petiolata (McCarthy, 1997) and Lonicera maackii (Miller and Gorchov, 2004) have been shown to decrease native plant reproduction, but this is the first reported case of Microstegium inhibiting seed production in a native plant.
Of the remaining 36 exotics, only four are common, i.e., Alliaria petiolata, Lonicera maackii, Robinia pseudoacacia (in the northern floodplain woods only), and Rosa multiflora.
Experimental extinction of garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) populations: implications for weed science and conservation biology.
Alliaria petiolata (Bieb.) Cavara & Grande.; Garlic Mustard; Woods and edges of fields; Abundant; (* #); C = 0; BSUH 11784.
Two species, Alliaria petiolata and Berberis thunbergii (Japanese barberry) appeared in the removal plots but not in the control plots in the last survey year (2007).
Alliaria petiolata (Bieb.) Cavara & Grande: Garlic mustard; April; field; frequent; USIH 1032.
Here, we evaluate all of these responses in the invasive biennial plant, garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata (Bieb.) Cavara & Grande).
All but nine of these (Alliaria petiolata, Lonicera maackii, Lysimachia nummularia, Phalaris arundinacea, Poa pratensis, Rorippa nasturtium-aquaticum, Rosa multiflora, Rumex crispus, and Urtica dioica) have failed to penetrate the interior of the forest.
Some species, such as the invasive Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard), show no evidence of AM colonization and can even suppress native plant growth by releasing antifungal phytochemicals that kill mycorrhizal fungi in other species (Stinson et al, 2006; Castellano and Gorchov, 2012).