optimum allocation

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optimum allocation

[′äp·tə·məm ‚al·ə′kā·shən]
(statistics)
A procedure used in stratified sampling to allocate numbers of sample units to different strata to either maximize precision at a fixed cost or minimize cost for a selected level of precision.
References in periodicals archive ?
Second, from Equation 23, the profit-based allocative efficiency index [AE[prime].
provides the correct incentives in terms of allocative efficiency.
Also, we accept that allocative efficiency arises in those districts that are primarily financed by a local property tax because of the Tiebout process capitalizing the value of local schools into local housing prices.
Allocative efficiency will result when the coefficients are equal across states (or groups of states) or are all equal to zero.
Third, a strand of the literature suggests that, besides the neoclassical allocative efficiency channel, the benefits of financial globalization are also realized through "collateral benefits" (Kose et al.
Finally, the allocative efficiency, which is a measure of efficiency that discloses the degree of "optimal input mix" utilization given cost minimization, is calculated as:
The larger the allocative efficiency score, the less efficient is the learning condition.
conducted above suggests that significant allocative efficiency gains
Allocative efficiency results when the marginal social benefit equals the marginal social cost.
Finally, they find that while completely eliminating frictions from factor adjustments would yield a dramatic increase in aggregate productivity through improved allocative efficiency, the reforms introduced in Colombia generated relatively modest improvements.
Yin 2000 Pulp producers 102 World Technical, cost, and allocative efficiency of pulp producers were evaluated.
These calculations are limited in two dimensions: firstly, to just the 'static' or allocative efficiency implications of price changes in terms of the (mis)allocation of resources generated by the raising of price (further) above marginal costs; and, secondly, to the direct impact on the air travel market.