allotrope

(redirected from Allotropes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

allotrope

any of two or more physical forms in which an element can exist
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

allotrope

[′a·lə‚trōp]
(chemistry)
A form of an element showing allotropy.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

allotrope

A chemical element that can take on different forms based on the structure of, or the number of atoms in, the molecule. The most common example is carbon. If carbon atoms are bonded in a lattice of four triangular surfaces (tetrahedral), it is a diamond. If the atoms are bonded in sheets of six-sided (hexagonal) lattice, it is graphite. See isotope.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
Its capability of forming sp, [sp.sup.2], and [sp.sup.3] bonds renders a large variety of carbon allotropes. Notably, diamond and graphite are the most well-known 3D allotropes of carbon, while graphene, carbon nanotube (CNT), and fullerene are the most widely studied 2D, 1D (or quasi-1D), and 0D allotropes.
Based on that theory, the thermodynamic stability of different graphyne allotropes was assessed by investigating their vibrational properties, lattice thermal expansion coefficients, and Gibbs free energy values.
Functionalization of nanostructured carbon allotropes by high-molecular compounds usually leads to the increased interaction between the nanofiller and the polymer matrix, ensuring considerable improvement of exploitation properties in comparison to neat polymer matrix.
Forms of carbon include several allotropes such as graphene and graphite as well as the fullerenes, which cover any molecule composed entirely of carbon, in the form of a hollow sphere, ellipsoid, or tube.
Following Jenkins, I consider the ethnic group one of the "allotropes" of the nation by virtue of their fundamental similarity as forms both of identification at the individual and group levels and of social categorization.
"As carbon descends through the atmosphere, amorphous carbon becomes graphite which then is converted into diamond, creating various strata of carbon allotropes (diamond)," the authors of the study (http://aas.org/files/resources/dps_abstract_book.pdf) noted .
"Nitrogen is the most abundant constituent in air and it is inert diatomic gas while graphite is the most thermodynamically stable form of carbon allotropes," said Prof.
Elemental Se has been known to exist in various allotropic forms, as red amorphous form, black vitreous form, three ([alpha], [beta], [gamma]) of red crystalline monoclinic forms and grey/black crystalline hexagonal (also referred to as trigonal) form which is also the most stable form, and some more allotropes are discovered recently (8), (9).
The mineral graphite is one of the allotropes of carbon and crystalline "flake" graphite is one of its principal types with plate-like structure.
Firstly, these materials are predominantly made up of pure carbon, and so are called carbon allotropes. These materials range from allotropes of diamond and graphite, to fullerenes, graphene and more complex structures such as car bon nanotubes.