Almagest


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Almagest:

see PtolemyPtolemy
(Claudius Ptolemaeus), fl. 2d cent. A.D., celebrated Greco-Egyptian mathematician, astronomer, and geographer. He made his observations in Alexandria and was the last great astronomer of ancient times.
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Almagest

(al -mă-jest) (Arabic: the Greatest) an astronomical work compiled by Ptolemy of Alexandria in about ad 140. It was translated from the original Greek into Arabic in the 9th century and became known in Europe when it was translated from Arabic into Latin in the late 12th century. Its 13 volumes cover the whole of astronomy as conceived in ancient times, with a detailed description of the Ptolemaic system of the Solar System. It also included a star catalog giving positions and magnitudes (from 1 to 6) of 1022 stars. This catalog was based mainly on the one produced in the 2nd century bc by Hipparchus of Nicaea.
References in periodicals archive ?
Em outras palavras, o movimento teorico aproxima-se do espirito do Almagest de Ptolomeu, ainda que a physis deste tenha sido astronomica, onde se identificava o que seriam as leis perpetuas dos movimentos dos astros, seres perfeitos e regulares na visao grega dos seres.
pero "in most respects his De revolutionibus (1543) follows Ptolemy's Almagest so closely that he can equally well be ragarded as the last great practiotioner of ancient astronomy" (Thoren, 2003: 3).
4) In his corpus, Ptolemy cites only two philosophers: Aristotle, here in Almagest 1.
KNOBEL, PtolemyS Catalogue of Stars: A Revision of the Almagest, Washington, The Carnegie Institution of Washington.
So nimmt es nicht Wunder, dass der Abt von Cluny all seine Uberredungskunste und sehr viel Geld zur Realisierung seines Islamprojektes einsetzen muss (72), da die angeworbenen Ubersetzer eigentlich auf der Suche nach einem arabischen Exemplar des ptolomaischen Almagest sind.
Among specific topics are between the Almagest and the Revolutions, the poetics of reflection in Virginia Woolf's short fiction, a phenomenological view of macrosynecdoche, the salience of incongruities in humorous texts and their resolution, image schemas as a way to analyze words and images with examples from William Blake and a Buddhist text, and the case of a curious quixotic Descuido and the role of translative texts.
For him, as for Ptolemy whose Almagest he paraphrases, the sphere is the only figure most fitting for circular motion such as that of celestial bodies, and is the noblest (ashraf al-ashkal), (17) most encompassing (azyaduha ihatatan), (18) and most perfect because of its unique form limited by a single surface.
After each list is compiled, a new generation or an adjoining culture finds a better way of constructing the tables, sometimes rediscovering old ways, yet all mimicking the reasoning and style of Ptolemy's Almagest and its recursive construction by way of versions of the half angle formulas and the addition formulas, whose modern day representatives are
F2) and the three "Chaldean" observations in the Almagest (IX.
Ptolemy, author of the Almagest, is relevant here for his Geography, a book that includes instructions on how to represent a three-dimensional world on a flat surface: a map.
Two of the articles in this issue, by Charles Burnett and John Crossley, explore medieval translations of Ptolemy's Almagest, written in the second century AD.
These were considerations taken up in the Almagest that led to Ptolemy's modifications of the epicyclic models of his predecessors, namely to the creation of the eccentric and equant models of the planets.