Alopias


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Alopias

 

(thresher sharks), the only genus of the family Alopidae of the suborder Selachoidei. Body length, up to 6 m; weight, up to 450 kg. The upper lobe of the tail is very long. There are four species, distributed in the warm waters of all oceans, usually far from shore. The thresher (Alopias vulpinus), which is found primarily in subtropical regions, migrates to moderately warm seas in the summer. The sharks are viviparous, bearing two to four young, which measure up to 1.5 m long. They feed on shoals of fish and on squids, which they stun with blows of the tail. Thresher sharks are not dangerous to man, and their commercial value is slight.

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Diel vertical migration of the bigeye thresher shark (Alopias superciliosus), a species possessing orbital retia mirabilia.
Age, growth, and reproduction of the pelagic thresher, Alopias pelagicus in the northwestern Pacific.
The functional role of the caudal fin in the feeding ecology of the common thresher shark Alopias uulpinus.
The requirement for a uniform large mesh size makes HMS DGN gear highly selective for pelagic market species such as swordfish; common thresher shark, Alopias vulpinas; and shortfin mako shark, Isums oxyrinchus, as small or undersized fish are able to swim through the mesh unharmed, whereas excessively large fish are unable to penetrate the mesh sufficiently to become trapped (Jennings et al., 2009).
Diel vertical migration of the bigeye threster shark, Alopias superciliosus, a species possessing orbital.
Additional species captured during the deep-set trials were bigeye thresher sharks, Alopias superciliosus (7); opah, Lampris guttatus (2); blue sharks, Prionace glauca (2); and common thresher shark, Alopias vulpinus (1) (Table 2, Fig.
Pan-Atlantic distribution patterns and reproductive biology of the bigeye thresher, Alopias superciliosus.
(2005), demostraron que la tasa de crecimiento embrionario en los generos Isurus y Alopias es menor que en C.
In 1990, the NMFS SWR began placing observers on board the portion of the California drift gillnet fishery targeting swordfish and thresher sharks, Alopias vulpinus.