alewife

(redirected from Alosa pseudoharengus)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Alosa pseudoharengus: alewives

alewife:

see herringherring,
common name for members of the large, widely distributed family Clupeidae, comprising many species of marine and freshwater food fishes, including the sardine (Sardinia), the menhaden (Brevoortia and Ethmidium), and the shad (Alosa).
..... Click the link for more information.
.

alewife

[′āl‚wīf]
(vertebrate zoology)
Pomolobus pseudoharengus. A food fish of the herring family that is very abundant on the Atlantic coast.
References in periodicals archive ?
Homing of alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) and blueback herring (A.
Feeding ecology and vertical migration of adult alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) in Lake Michigan.
A comparison of scale and otolith aging methods for the alewife, Alosa pseudoharengus. Fish.
Feeding habits of alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) larvae in freshwater lakes (Norden, 1968), in laboratory experiments (Miller et al., 1990), and of congeneric larval alosines (American shad [A.
The two major fish that feed in the water column, white perch (Morone americana) and alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus).
Early life history of Lake Michigan alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) inferred from intra-otolith stable isotope ratios.
Prey species Common name Family Alosa pseudoharengus alewife Clupeidae Ammodytes spp.
Specific fatty acid [delta][sup.13]C signatures for gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus), and alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), show a 10[per thousand] range among fishes, clearly reflecting isotopically distinct dietary sources.
Planktivory by alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and ranbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) on microcrustacan zooplankton and dreissenid (Bivalvia: Dreissenidae) veligers in southern Lake Ontario.
Gizzard shad, white perch (Morone americana), and anadromous herrings (Alosa pseudoharengus and Alosa aestivalis) were the main constituents of the diet of both sizes of striped bass in the tidal freshwater region (Table 3, Fig.
Essig and Cole (1986) estimated mortality rates of larval alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) by using both converted length-frequency distributions, as we did, and actual age-frequency distributions.
The marine distribution of the alewife, Alosa pseudoharengus, another herring, was correlated with the seasonal distribution, availability, and abundance of its euphausiid prey (Stone and Jessop, 1994).