Alphard

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Alphard

(al -fard) (α Hya) An orange giant that is the brightest star in the constellation Hydra and lies in a part of the sky where there are few other stars of comparable brightness. mv : 2.05; spectral type: K4 III; distance: 35 pc.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Alphard

(language)
(Named after the brightest star in Hydra) A Pascal-like language developed by Wulf, Shaw and London of CMU in 1974. Alphard supports data abstraction using the 'form', which combines a specification and an implementation.

["Abstraction and Verification in Alphard: Defining and Specifying Iteration and Generators", Mary Shaw, CACM 20(8):553-563, Aug 1977].
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
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Star hop from 7 Sextantis, which lies almost halfway between Alpha Leonis and Alpha Hydrae. The galaxy is just under a degree away to the southeast; a triangle of 9th-magnitude stars northeast of the galaxy points the way.
The star Alphard, also known as alpha Hydrae, could easily seen as a yellow-white diamond hanging on her slender neck (remember she is a woman).
Most westerly is the open cluster M48 (NGC 2458), 20[degrees] due east of mag +2 Alphard (Alpha Hydrae, the constellation's rather solitary brightest star).
Procyon and Regulus form a nearly right triangle with Alphard (Alpha Hydrae), the lonely, orange, 2nd-magnitude heart of Hydra the Sea Serpent.
About 10 minutes into the observation, a sprite 15 [degrees] in length flashed into view near Alpha Hydrae. It looked like a phantom jellyfish.
Sweeping through Hydra, he spotted an 8th-magnitude tailless glow west of Alpha Hydrae at around 4:15 that morning.
T Pyxidis is located 24[degrees] south of 2nd-magnitude Alphard (Alpha Hydrae), though at 14th magnitude it's much too faint to be seen with the naked eye in its normal state.
Sweeping through Hydra with a 6-inch scope, he picked up an 8th-magnitude tailless glow west of Alpha Hydrae. Fifteen minutes later Tsutomu Seki, searching independently from Kochi, 400 km away, also spotted the same object.
In just 15 minutes they measured the disk of the red giant star Alphard (Alpha Hydrae) to be 9.3 milliarcseconds wide in infrared light, with a very high precision of plus or minus 0.2 milliarcsecond--an uncertainty of just 2 percent.