Mirfak

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Mirfak

(meer -fak) (α Per) A remote creamy-yellow supergiant that is the brightest star in the constellation Perseus. mv : 1.80; spectral type: F5 Ib; distance: 190 pc.
References in periodicals archive ?
But these three constellations are also rich in 2nd-magnitude stars (six of them if you include Beta (p) Tauri that completes the pentagon pattern of Auriga) and bristling with bright open clusters: the Perseus Double Cluster; the Alpha Persei Cluster; M34 in Perseus; M36, M37, and M38 in Auriga; and M35 in Gemini.
And high above Capella is Perseus, with its famous variable star Algol, and slightly brighter Alpha ([alpha]) Persei, the brightest of a large, loose group of young stars known as the Alpha Persei Association.
And it's worth spending some time viewing the star rich area around Mirphak (Alpha Per), which is also an open cluster--sometimes referred to as the Alpha Persei Group, and also catalogued as Melotte 20.
Mr Griffiths and his team caught the comet with a Canon EOS 350D digital camera, but say it can be spotted using a pair of binoculars if people look to the north east below the W-shaped constellation of Cassiopeia, close to the bright star Alpha Persei.
The Alpha Persei Cluster has plenty of easy, pretty double stars for binocular observers.
They include the prominent naked-eye patches of M31 (the Andromeda Galaxy), the Double Cluster of Perseus, and the Alpha Persei Cluster --plus the more challenging naked-eye deep-sky objects M34 (open star cluster in Perseus), NGC 752 (open star cluster in Andromeda), and M15 (globular star cluster in Pegasus).
One of the finest examples is the Alpha Persei Association nearly straight overhead in December and January.
Like the Alpha Persei Association discussed last month, the Pleiades are one of a handful of deep-sky treasures best appreciated with binoculars.
Binoculars convert the dim naked-eye stars around Alpha (a) Persei into a bright, sprawling array: the Alpha Persei Association, a swarm of moderately young stars that were born together and are now drifting apart.
For example, consider the Alpha Persei Association, also known as Melotte 20.
better seen through binoculars, is the Alpha Persei Cluster, some 600
Yellow-white Mirfak is part of a loose group (not a gravitationally-bound cluster) called the Alpha Persei Association, or Melotte 20.