Inhibitor

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Related to Alpha-glucosidase inhibitor: thiazolidinedione

inhibitor

[in′hib·əd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A substance bonded, taped, or dip-dried onto a solid propellant to restrict the burning surface and to give direction to the burning process.
(chemistry)
A substance which is capable of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction; to be technically useful, it must be effective in low concentration.

Inhibitor

 

a circuit having m + n inputs and a single output, at which a signal can appear only when there are no signals on the m inputs (inhibiting). The other n inputs (principal) form one of the two logic connections, “AND” or “OR.” Inhibitors are used extensively in computers. They are very often understood to be a circuit having a single principal input and a single inhibiting input. A signal appears at the output of such a circuit when a signal is present on the principal input but there is none on the inhibiting input. Such an inhibitor is called an anticoincidence gate; its conventional representation is given in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Block diagram of an anticoincidence gate (inhibitor) with m — 1 and n 1:(A) principal input, (Q) inhibiting input, (Ga) anticoincidence gate

inhibitor

A substance added to paint to retard drying, skinning, mildew growth, etc. Also see corrosion inhibitor, inhibiting pigment, drying inhibitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are now two alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (AL-fa gloo-KOS-ih-dayss in-HIB-it-ers): acarbose (AK-er-bose) and miglitol (MIG-lih-tall).
TABLE 1 How these antidiabetic drugs affect weight (3) Weight gain Weight neutral Weight loss Insulin Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors GLP-1 agonists Meglitinides Bromocriptine Metformin Sulfonylureas Colesevelam Pramlintide Thiazolidinediones DPP-4 inhibitors SGLT2 inhibitors DPP-4, dipeptidyl peptidase-4; GLP-1, glucagon-like peptide-1; SGLT2, sodium-glucose co-transporter 2.
Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors block intestinal absorption of carbohydrates.
There are now two alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, acarbose (AK-er-bose) and miglitol (MIG-leh-tall).
Glucagon -like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP1RA) have consistently been associated with a slight, but significant, increase in pulse rate.7 However, they, along with sodium glucose co-transporter (SGLT) 2 inhibitors, pioglitazone and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, are able to reduce blood pressure significantly.7-10 Older sulfonylureas, such as glibenclamide, on the other hand, may be associated with a rise in diastolic blood pressure.11 In a person with acute haemodynamic compromise, both gastrointestinal and subcutaneous absorption may be impaired.
The alpha-glucosidase inhibitors are effective in lowering PPG because they delay carbohydrate absorption, with one meta-analysis reporting mean reductions of 42 and 49 mg/dL for acarbose and miglitol, respectively.
In the retail arena pharmacists who had been dispensing sulfonylureas, oral drugs that stimulate the pancreas to work harder to make insulin (and sometimes helping the body to more effectively use insulin), are also now receiving prescription orders for biguanides and, more recently, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors.
Persons with MCD should preferentially be offered GLP1RA or SGLT2i, as second line drugs after metformin.12-15 Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs) and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (DPP4i) may also be prescribed.
Not discussed are the alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, the glinides, or pramlintide, which were not included in the 2 tiers of preferred therapies by the ADA/EASD panel.
Oral alternatives to metformin included the sulfonylureas, pioglitazone, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors and gliptins.
Pharmacologic agents that counteract PPG excursions include rapid-acting insulin secretagogues (glinides, ie, repaglinide, nateglinide), alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (acarbose, miglitol), and rapid-acting insulin analogs.