Alphonse and Gaston


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Alphonse and Gaston

personifications of overdone politeness. [Comics: Horn, 77–78]
References in periodicals archive ?
American and Iranian plans for nuclear negotiations were reduced to an Alphonse and Gaston routine this past week as each said the other must go first at the October 15-16 talks in Geneva.
A POPULAR comic strip in America many years ago featured two bumbling characters, Alphonse and Gaston, both of whom had a penchant for politeness.
It seems to me Congress and the Supreme Court are engaged in a game of Alphonse and Gaston, as each waits for the other to act on the constitutional objections raised against the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012 (Republic Act 10175).
This strategy was to prevent collisions with my teammates and avoid what our coach called an 'Alphonse and Gaston" and have the ball drop between us.
The leadership of both political parties betrayed state and local governments by agreeing to a carefully crafted bipartisan bill and then playing Alphonse and Gaston at the end of the session to not act.
His best-known cartoon was the bloated and repulsive picture of Big Business that he called "the Trusts." His most noted comic strips were a hobo, <IR> HAPPY HOOLIGAN </IR> , and his comic Frenchmen, Alphonse and Gaston. He published collections of some of his productions, among them Our Antediluvian Ancestors (1902), Happy Hooligan (1902), and Alphonse and Gaston (1902).
And we're trying to get this guy [Rubinstein] out of town on a plane.' They then engaged in an Alphonse and Gaston conversation about compensation: