Alta California


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Alta California

(äl`tə kăl'ĭfôr`nyə), term used by the Spanish to refer to their possessions along the entire Pacific coast north of the Mexican state of Baja California. California was often represented on maps as an island some 3,000 mi (4,800 km) long until the 18th-century explorations of the Jesuit father Eusebio Kino proved conclusively that the southern part of the area was a peninsula and the rest of it mainland. Thereafter the peninsula came to be called Baja (Lower) and the mainland Alta (Upper) California.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(41.) "Chinese Difficulties," Daily Alta California, Marcho, 1851, vol.
Del tal suerte que, si nos concentramos en el ano de 1829, recordaremos que Espana hacia el intento por invadir Mexico independiente; mientras que el Gobernador de la Alta California, Jose Maria Echeandia [1825--1831 y 1832--1833], extendia un generoso titulo de concesion al soldado Arguello, por una superficie de 4,387.5 hectareas.
The Forgotten Governor: Fernando de Rivera and the Opening of Alta California is a studious biography of Don Fernando de Rivera y Moncada (1725-1781), a Spanish soldier who also served as the third governor of Alta California.
Much dust has been kicked up by this canonization of the founder of the Spanish missions system in Alta California. Serra started in San Diego in 1769 and built a system of 21 missions along the fabled El Camino Real, winding up to the final one and San Francisco Solano, built after his death, in 1830 in Sonoma - a stretch of 700 miles.
In what was then known as Alta California, Serra established a system of Catholic missions in which California Native Americans lived and were largely coerced to become Christian.
A column in the January 24,1850, Daily Alta California declared: "Our merchants must organize some system of private watchmen." Because the private sector had needs that government clearly did not meet, it decided to create a system of private police.
The Spanish Portola expedition charting Alta California arrived in September 1769 into the Los Osos Valley and camped in the Morro Bay territory.