Altneuland

Altneuland

Theodore Herzl’s imaginative description of the future Zionist settlement in Palestine. [Jewish Hist.: Collier’s, XIX, 79]
See: Judaism

Altneuland

future Jewish state; “if willed, no fairytale.” [Hung. Lit.: Altneuland, Wigoder, 21]
See: Utopia
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El hecho de que los palestinos no hayan asumido la fantasia proyectada para ellos por el "padre del Sionismo" Theodor Herzl en su novela Altneuland consistente en que son un pueblo que estaria agradecido por la colonizacion judia que los rescato de su incivilizacion, continua siendo a los ojos del sionismo, una patologia insuperable: nada menos que la patologia del anti-sionismo categorizada como antisemitismo.
The novel's title echoes Theodore Herzl's iconic Altneuland (Old-New Land), a story of the ideal Jewish city, a Vienna on the Mediterranean, that later became a major inspiration for the construction of Tel Aviv.
In Altneuland, Theodor Herzl's novel describing the imagined Jewish state, the Jews had no army.
In his novel Altneuland, Theodor Herzl, the father of modern Zionism, had himself forecast that economic prosperity--just as Cahan later argued and, most recently, Shimon Peres maintains--would be the solution to overcoming any lingering animosity among the Arabs toward the Jewish presence.
Other critical essays on same-sex desire in Eliot's texts include Monika Muller, "Nineteenth-Century Narraceons [sic]: Race, Gender, and (National) Identity in Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin and Dred and George Eliot's Daniel Deronda," Gender Forum 3 (2002); Joanne Long Demaria, "The Wondrous Marriages or Daniel Deronda: Gender, Work, and Love," Studies in the Novel 22 (1990), 403-417; and Jacob Press, "Same Sex Unions in Modern Europe: Daniel Deronda, Altneuland, and the Homoerotics of Jewish Nationalism," in Novel Gazing: Queer Readings in Fiction, ed.
As Miriam Eliav-Feldon remarks, Herzl symptomatically "devoted time to the writing of Altneuland when most in despair over his political activities" ("'If You Will It, It Is No Fairy Tale'," 96).
Bachman notes that JDub brought "together countless young Jews in the altneuland of their own identity project," and the reference to Theodor Herzl's novel of Zionist utopia feels apt.
the organization Hovevei Zion), who were more than willing to leave their countries of residence in exchange for the Altneuland (German "old-new land" and the title of Herzl's 1902 visionary novel).
Our discussion is drawn from sources in Herzl's own writings: In the Matter of the Jews, The Jewish State, and Altneuland, and aimed to explore the realization of Herzl's ideas, as expressed in the State of Israel 62 years after Independence, and to seek answers to the question of what still remains to be achieved and the nature of the Zionist vision for the next 150 years.
Herzl's novel, Altneuland, is not simply utopian, rather "it is a utopian colonial novel" (37).
Jacqueline Rose uses Scholem's notion to interpret the historical trajectory of Zionism from the writing of Herzl's utopian novel Altneuland (1902) up to the foundation of the state of Israel as "Jewish state" in Palestine (1948) and the current situation of occupation and progressive destruction of Palestinian society.