duct

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Related to Alveolar ducts: alveolar sacs

duct

1. any bodily passage, esp one conveying secretions or excretions
2. a narrow tubular cavity in plants, often containing resin or some other substance
3. a channel or pipe carrying electric cable or wires

Duct

A nonmetallic or metallic tube for housing wires or cables, may be underground or embedded in concrete floor slabs; a duct usually fabricated of metal, used to transfer air from one location to another.

duct

[dəkt]
(anatomy)
An enclosed tubular channel for conducting a glandular secretion or other body fluid.
(communications)
An enclosed runway for cables.
(geophysics)
The space between two air layers, or between an air layer and the earth's surface, in which microwave beams are trapped in ducting. Also known as radio duct; tropospheric duct.
(mechanical engineering)
A fluid flow passage which may range from a few inches in diameter to many feet in rectangular cross section, usually constructed of galvanized steel, aluminum, or copper, through which air flows in a ventilation system or to a compressor, supercharger, or other equipment at speeds ranging to thousands of feet per minute.

duct

1. ,See air duct.
2. In electric systems, a metallic or nonmetallic tube, (usually circular, oval, rectangular, or octagonal) for housing wires or cables; may be underground or embedded in concrete floor slabs.

duct

A thin-wall tube installed in aircraft air-conditioning and heating systems to carry heated or cooled air for distribution to various aircraft locations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Muscularization of the normally poorly muscularized small arteries/arterioles adjacent to alveolar ducts (immunohistochemistry for smooth muscle actin, original magnification x20).
In addition, the collagen content in septa of the alveolar duct increased with ongoing exposure, marking the potential onset of fibrosis.
At this single exposure concentration, F344 rats retain particles of diesel soot and CD primarily within macrophages located within the lumens of alveolar ducts and alveoli.
One broader anatomic compartment was referred to as parenchymal lumens and consisted of lumens of alveolar ducts and alveoli in rats and lumens of respiratory bronchioles, alveolar ducts, and alveoli in humans.
In all three groups of rats, 82-85% of the retained particulate material was located in the alveolar and alveolar duct lumens, primarily in macrophages.
Septum of alveolar duct or alveolus Including septa of alveolar outpocketings of respiratory bronchioles in humans 9.
Models of particle (aerosol) deposition have demonstrated the importance of respiratory bronchiole and alveolar duct structures in particle deposition (26-29).
(44) Histologically, organizing pneumonia is characterized by plugs of granulation tissue, composed of fibroblasts within a myxoid or edematous stroma, which are located within bronchiolar lumens, alveolar ducts, and associated alveolar airspaces (Figure 9).
Lying within the bronchiolar lumen and also within adjacent alveolar ducts and alveoli, there are collections of macrophages containing finely granular brown cytoplasmic pigment (Figure 10).
For example, in some patients, especially heavy smokers, anthracotic pigment may be identified along alveolar ducts and respiratory bronchioles; however, there is typically less pigment deposition and less airway fibrosis than in patients with mineral dust-associated bronchiolitic diseases.
Some cases of organizing DAD may, however, contain comparatively prominent intraalveolar or alveolar duct fibrosis and therefore, OP may arise in the histologic differential diagnosis.
The extent of centrilobular nodules correlated with the number of macrophages in respiratory bronchioles and with chronic inflammation of respiratory bronchioles, whereas the extent of ground-glass opacity correlated with the amount of macrophage accumulation in the alveoli and alveolar ducts.