Alypius

Alypius

or

Alypios

(both: əlĭp`ēəs), fl. c.360, Greek author of Introduction to Music, chief source of modern knowledge of Greek musical notation.
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Augustine's baptism (together with Adeodatus and Alypius) was actually on the night of April 24-25 (Easter eve), 387, at the hands of Ambrose, rather than on the second day after the conversion (end of August, 386).
He shares a house with hometown friend, Alypius. As he and Alypius delightfully greet a mutual friend, Augustine, again, speaks about his homeland of Africa "...
In Confessions 6, Augustine diagnoses this condition in his friend Alypius, who "falls" tragically because he cannot give up gazing on the spectacle of violence at gladiator shows.) When Dionyza fakes a funeral for Marina, Gower equates the ceremony with images and theater: "See how belief may suffer by foul show" (4.4.23).
Augustine to Alypius (Letter 10, AD 422-28), reprinted in 81 THE FATHERS OF THE CHURCH 74, 78 (Thomas P.
sense turns the soul toward the ordinate love of neighbor (Alypius is
After halting, Augustine "hurried back to the place where Alypius was sitting.
He only discovered that all he thought was already written by the other: "not in dissipation and drunkness, nor in debauchery and lewdness, nor in arguing and jealousy." (35) In the garden, he was still in the limbo of his resistance, because he stopped reading and didn't see further to the next phrase that was "Make room for the person who is weak in faith." He holds out against these divine phrases and he goes to report the passage read as a piece of news to his friend Alypius. He took upon himself the role of a witness of a fact, instead of making himself into the direct witness of his word--creation.
Alypius spent fifty-three years standing upon his pillar.
In the sixth book of his Confessions, Augustine explains how a Christian friend of his, a certain Alypius, came to be obsessed with Roman gladiatorial combats.
He grew up in Grangetown where his father Alypius ran a printing works.
188 is from both Augustine and Alypius, supporter of Augustine and bishop of Thagaste, emphasizing the institutional grounding of Augustine's rhetoric: this is an epistle of ecclesiastical import, not merely a letter of ascetic counsel.