Amalekites

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Related to Amalek: Esau

Amalekites

(ăm`ələkīts), in the Bible, aboriginal people of Canaan and the Sinai peninsula. They waged constant warfare against the Hebrews until dispersed by Saul. Their ancestor, Amalek, for whom they were named, was a duke of Edom and Esau's descendant.

Amalekites

Israel’s hereditary foe and symbol of perpetual hatred. [Jew. Hist.: Wigoder, 24]
See: Enemy
References in periodicals archive ?
Even the story of Saul's battle against Amalek offers clear instances of this additional usage.
39) For detailed treatment of some of these cases see Halbertal, Interpretative Revolutions in the Making and much of Avi Sagi's work, for example, "The Punishment of Amalek in Jewish Tradition: Coping with the Moral Problem," The Harvard Theological Review, Vol.
33) "The Modern Amalek," The Reconstructionist (March 6, 1942): 3, 4.
Indeed, some of the rabbis say that these Canaanites were actually Amalek in disguise.
Henry Knight's focus is also in three chapters which explore in great detail both Genesis 32 and Matthew 26 and how to operationalize these kinds of dialogical explorations based on texts; he also explores in a passionate essay how to deal with the idea of the Holy in light of the Shoah; his final chapter is entitled Coming to Terms with Amalek.
And, in the view of Magen Avraham, the reason why we do not recall this, as indeed we recall [zakhor] what Amalek plotted against us, is that it also recalls and reminds of Israel's ignominy.
He concludes, for example, that Philo's understanding of warring relations with Amalek teach "the superiority of the ethereal to the material," "one of Philo's favorite themes.
The reader does not know who Joshua is, or why Moses chose him to serve as military commander in the battle against Amalek.
And Samuel then berated Saul and let him know that the Lord repented of His choice of Saul, for he had not fulfilled His command to kill off all of Amalek.
It is also from a moral standpoint that he criticizes Goldhagen's attack on the German people as "a monument to revenge" and a self-defeating remembrance of Amalek (p.
This paper proposes to show that the two exhortations in Scripture (Exodus and Deuteronomy) concerning Amalek are based on two separate episodes.
The children of Israel, after the Exodus from Egypt, and after their victories over Amalek, Edom, Arad, Sihon, and Og, came unbidden to the borders of Moab.