Amalekites

(redirected from Amalekite)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Amalekites

(ăm`ələkīts), in the Bible, aboriginal people of Canaan and the Sinai peninsula. They waged constant warfare against the Hebrews until dispersed by Saul. Their ancestor, Amalek, for whom they were named, was a duke of Edom and Esau's descendant.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Amalekites

Israel’s hereditary foe and symbol of perpetual hatred. [Jew. Hist.: Wigoder, 24]
See: Enemy
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because such rivalrous fidelity to a woman threatens his mythos of male identity, the child who at boarding school was persecuted as a despised Amalekite feels compelled to suppress a vulnerability that he associates with the complexity of adult love.
(3.) The young Amalekite, of course, had at Saul's own request
According to the first book of Samuel, God orders King Saul to strike at the Amalekite people, killing every man, woman and child, and even wiping out their livestock (1 Samuel 15:2-3).
Was it not by chance, that is, without it being his intention or purpose, that the Amalekite encountered King Saul on Mount Gilboa with such disastrous consequences?
When the king's minister, Haman, entered the banquet, Mordekhai looked away because Haman was an Amalekite (the Amalekites had attacked Mordekhai's ancestors in the wilderness a thousand years earlier).
Lewin cites the biblical destruction of the tribe of Amalek as a precedent for measures deemed "ordinarily unacceptable." Those who consult the first book of Samuel will find the Amalekite incident vividly described.
This account of David's decision to allow Joab's crime--a crime which could have had negative repercussions on the unification process of the two kingdoms--to go unpunished contrasts the account of David's earlier swift but dubious "justice" against an Amalekite messenger who, in bringing the news that King Saul was dead, made the fatal mistake of also admitting that he himself had helped the mortally wounded Saul end his life in what amounted to an act of euthanasia.
There is also argument based on David's order that the Amalekite be killed for the slaying of King Saul, at Saul's request, after his failed suicide attempt.
like the might symbolized by the unicorn's horn.(34) Furthermore, the translator took an important interpretative decision when he decided to render [character no conversion] (which refers to the Amalekite king, Agag, cf.
Trevor-Roper: "an academic opponent is not an Amalekite to be smitten hip and thigh."
So might it Saul, had he killed the Amalekite king.
We have David's reaction to the Amalekite who claims to have killed Saul at Mount Gilboa and who may be embellishing the story for his own supposed benefit.