Amalthea

(redirected from Amaltheia)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Amalthea

(ăm'əlthē`ə), in astronomy, one of the 39 known moons, or natural satellites, of JupiterJupiter
, in astronomy, 5th planet from the sun and largest planet of the solar system. Astronomical and Physical Characteristics

Jupiter's orbit lies beyond the asteroid belt at a mean distance of 483.6 million mi (778.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Amalthea

(ă-mal -th'ee-ă) One of the inner group of Jupiter's satellites that was discovered in 1892 by E.E. Barnard and until 1979 was thought to be the innermost satellite. It has been greatly distorted by the gravitational pull of Jupiter, becoming markedly elongated in shape (270 × 166 × 150 km); its long axis points toward Jupiter. Photographs from the Voyager probes show the surface is very red, due probably to sulfur contamination from Io. The albedo is generally low, but the bright rather greenish patches have a reflectivity of up to 20% (albedo 0.2) and may be due to recently exposed material that contains less sulfur-rich glass. Its two main craters are bowl-shaped: Pan is 90 km in diameter and Gaea is 75 km. The Galileo orbiter flew past Amalthea in November 2002 but did not image it. See Table 2, backmatter.

Amalthea

[‚äm·äl′thē·ə]
(astronomy)
The innermost known satellite of Jupiter, orbiting at a mean distance of 1.13 × 105 miles (1.82 × 105 kilometers); it has a diameter of about 150 miles (240 kilometers). Also known as Jupiter V.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nurtured there by his grandmother, Gaia, he was fed by the goat Amaltheia (still today a popular name for restaurants on Crete).
6-7, Cicero again alludes to Plato's inspirational motif and also to his cross-referencing of water nymphs and Muses: Atticus' praise of the speakers' island location and of the river Fibrenus, with explicit recall of Socrates' praise of location in the Phaedrus, leads to Cicero's praise of the river Thyamis at Atticus' estate in Epirus and thence to Quintus' praise of Atticus' shrine to the river nymph Amaltheia and its associated plane trees.
He was brought up in a cave on Mount Dicte in Crete, where he was suckled by the goat Amaltheia, nursed by nymphs, and protected from discovery by the Curetes, sons of Rhea, who drowned his cries by dancing and clashing their shields.