Amati

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Amati

(ämä`tē), Italian family of violinmakers of Cremona. The founder of the Cremona school was Andrea Amati (c.1520–c.1578), whose earliest violins date from c.1564. His labels bore the name Amadus, and he is credited with the basic design of the modern violin. His sons were Antonio Amati and Girolamo or Geronimo Amati, who worked together and followed closely their father's patterns in making violins of graceful shape and sweet tone. The Amati instruments had a characteristic amber-colored varnish. Niccolò Amati (1596–1684), son of Girolamo, brought the Amati violin to its height after c.1645. Antonio StradivariStradivari, Antonio
, or Antonius Stradivarius
, 1644–1737, Italian violin maker of Cremona; pupil of Niccolò Amati. He was apprenticed to Amati c.1658 and may have remained with him until Amati's death in 1684.
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 and Andrea Guarneri were pupils of Niccolò. Niccolò's son, Girolamo (1649–1740), was the last of his line to achieve distinction. The Latin forms of the first names, Andreas, Antonius, Hieronymus, and Nicolaus, were generally used on the violin labels, and the family name was sometimes Latinized as Amatus.
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Amati

1. a family of Italian violin makers, active in Cremona in the 16th and 17th centuries, esp Nicolò (niko'l%), 1596--1684, who taught Guarneri and Stradivari
2. a violin or other stringed instrument made by any member of this family
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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Miranda, in one episode, when asking Hans about languages she learned in school, triumphantly rattled off "amo, amas, amat, amamus, amatis, amant!" Latin grammar was so drummed into our minds that, like Miranda, even today I can still remember how to say in Latin I love, you love, he, she or it loves, we love, you (plural) love and they love.