Amboina


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Amboina:

see AmbonAmbon
, island, c.300 sq mi (775 sq km), E Indonesia, one of the Moluccas, in the Banda Sea. It is mountainous, well watered, and fertile. Corn and sago are produced, and hunting and fishing supplement the diet.
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, Indonesia.

Amboina

1. an island in Indonesia, in the Moluccas. Capital: Amboina. Area: 1000 sq. km (386 sq. miles)
2. a port in the Moluccas, the capital of Amboina island
References in periodicals archive ?
Of these five projects, the largest in terms of investment commitments is PT Hasil Tambak Amboina of the Jayanti Group (Rp 775.9 billion).
Borneo, Menado, Celebes, Amboina, Ternate, Bali en Lombok" -- in other words, virtually all of the Outer Islands of the Dutch Indies.
For new project, PT Hasil Tambak Amboina is the biggest in terms of its investment plan, that is, Rp 775 billion.
The same year 8,000 Vietnamese cups were shipped to Amboina.(93) An entry from the Amboina Dagh-Register shows a typical stock held in secondary godowns at the end of 1672.
During the second half of the nineteenth century the area was formally divided by the Dutch into "gebied" (regentships), firstly within the Residency of Banda and later Amboina. By 1881 "Gebied" had been divided into kampong and the variously titled rulers ostensibly reduced to kampong heads.
The rajas of Ondor and Kataloka spend long periods each year in Amboina, and sometimes even travel further afield.
In that year, at the suggestion of Sumarko, then pert administrator in Amboina, Raja Wattimena of Kataloka embarked on the building of a pier and godown, and for the first time permitted traders to settle in his domain.
The history of this sort of information for Java has been told most thoroughly by Peter Boomgaard.(2) Contrary to what is sometimes assumed, there are a few areas in Southeast Asia for which information of a demographic nature, based on estimates and/or proto-censuses, is available for a much earlier period.(3) The Ambon Islands or the "Province of Amboina", as the colonial authorities used to call the greater part of present-day Maluku Tengah, is the most outstanding example of this.
Finally, a few remarks will be made about the demography of Amboina over a much longer perspective and comparisons will be drawn with general developments elsewhere in Southeast Asia, in particular with Java.