Platypodidae

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Platypodidae

[‚plad·ə′päd·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The ambrosia beetles, a family of coleopteran insects in the superfamily Curculionoidea.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mycobiota associated with the ambrosia beetle Megaplatypus mutatus: threat to poplar plantations.
A small percentage of ambrosia beetle species introduced into non-native habitats cause significant damage to live trees whereas most species continue to occupy their original ecological niche, dead wood.
The invasive redbay ambrosia beetle spreads laurel wilt disease.
Haack and Petrice (2009) also reported colonization of heat-treated logs and boards of lumber with bark left intact by species of bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) and species of long homed beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).
Changes in behaviour of two species of North America bark beetles, an Asian ambrosia beetle and three species of European foliage feeding insects, which may, at least in part, be attributed to climate change, are described in the literature.
Quercivorol, the male aggregation pheromone of an ambrosia beetle.
Effects of ambrosia beetle attack on Cercis canadensis.
The bark beetles and ambrosia beetles of North and Central America (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), a taxonomic monograph.
A fungal symbiont of the redbay ambrosia beetle causes a lethal will in redbay and other Lauraceae in the southeastern United States.
We carry one figure from soft maple that we call ambrosia beetle--others may call it wormy soft maple--mostly because the worm holes are caused by the ambrosia beetle making small holes where ground water and sap from the tree pick up minerals and cause a discoloration, making long streaks of blue and green and orange.
Keywords: Granulate ambrosia beetle, common pine shoot beetle, emerald ash borer, insect activity, ornamental pests
Other markings include pinholes bored by the ambrosia beetle and corkscrew trails left by the squiggly worm.