Amdo


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Amdo

 

the obsolete name for the northeast section of the Tibetan highlands, along the upper Yellow River in the Tsinghai Province of the People’s Republic of China. It is a mountainous, woodless area, altitudes 3,500–5,000 m, with sparse dry steppe vegetation on crude skeletal soils. Conifer forests appear on the northern slopes. There are thickets of shrubs and meadows along the rivers and small areas of irrigated farmland. The Russian traveler P. K. Kozlov described this area while on an expedition during 1907–09.

REFERENCE

Kozlov, P. K. Mongoliia i Amdo i mertvyi gorod Khara-Khoto, 2nd ed. Moscow, 1947.
References in periodicals archive ?
The black rock series for this study come from exposures in Gangni village (Township) and Amdo 114 station (of the Qinghai-Tibet highway), north-central Tibet (Fig.
Kumbum Monastery in Amdo, Tibet, has 10,000 visitors each day, and the monks are constantly doing pujas for money and have become businessmen.
Eira Mawr Y llan dan amdo llonydd, - a'i degwch Yn dagwr heolydd; Ei wen faneg am fynydd A'i lendid yn gwrlid gwy e dd.
But refugees from far-flung areas of Tibet such as Amdo and parts of Kham were not so fortunate.
Mae'r meirwon wedi eu gorchuddio a chadachau euraidd, a'r elor liwgar yn cael ei drochi yn yr afon cyn tynnu'r llieiniau a rhoi'r ymadawedig yn ei amdo plaen ar y tan oer.
which Tibetans claim as the former Tibetan provinces of Kham and Amdo.
Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands (Dona Flor Y sus dos maridos), adapt: Jroge Ali Triana (also dir), Veronica Triana from Jorge Amdo, trans: Alberto Galindo.
2), depicting a prostrate figure pinned down by the tremendous weight of a concrete block, refers to the urbanisation of a new area at Amdo, where the government moved nomads into concrete houses.
Este plan, sin embargo, no se aplico en las provincias tibetanas de Kham Oriental y Amdo, que China consideraba como propias.
A group of monks from the Kirti monastery released 32 gruesome pictures that they said showed the tortured corpses of their counterparts in the monastery in Ngapa county of Amdo province.
Large communities of ethnic Tibetans live outside Tibet in areas that were the Himalayan region's eastern and north-eastern provinces of Amdo and Kham until the communist takeover in 1951.