Bloomer, Amelia

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Bloomer, Amelia (b. Jenks)

(1818–94) reformer; born in Homer, N.Y. She wrote on current affairs for her husband's newspaper before founding and editing Lily (1849–55), a temperance journal that, under the influence of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, also championed women's rights. In Lily, her public defense of women's adopting a daring outfit of full trousers under a short skirt became a national cause célèbre, and the costume was nicknamed "bloomers." After she moved to Iowa (1855), her local activism was partly responsible for that state's 1873 equal rights legislation.
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.

Bloomer, Amelia

(1818–1894) dress reformer; designed bloomers. [Am. Hist.: Flexner, 391]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
1818: Women's rights campaigner Amelia Jenks Bloomer was born in New York.
1818: Women's rights activist Amelia Jenks Bloomer was born in New York.
Libby Addy scored three goals for Whiston while Amelia Jenks played outstandingly well for Kings Park.
Amelia Jenks Bloomer lived during the mid-1800s, when women didn't have many rights.
By introducing her pair of Turkish-style trousers, Amelia Jenks Bloomer reclaimed the harem as a site of freedom.
It is fascinating to read what Amelia Jenks Bloomer did besides being an advocate for comfortable clothes for women, and amusing to learn about the adventures of Deborah Dunch Moody, thorn in the side of colonial men.
FEMINIST Amelia Jenks Bloomer, a New York postmistress, invented the baggy pants in 1851 to ride a cycle while championing women's rights.
Bloomers were invented by Amelia Jenks Bloomer, who thought ladies underpants should reach the ankles to preserve modesty.