Amenhotep IV


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Related to Amenhotep IV: Tutankhamun, Ramses II, Ramses, Nefertiti, Thutmose II

Amenhotep IV

or

Amenophis IV

: see IkhnatonIkhnaton
or Akhenaton
[Egyptian,=Aton is satisfied], d. c.1354 B.C., king of ancient Egypt (c.1372–1354 B.C.), of the XVIII dynasty; son and successor of Amenhotep III. His name at his accession was Amenhotep IV, but he changed it to honor the god Aton.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Upon the death of Amenhotep III, his son, Amenhotep IV, ascended to the throne and for a time, continued as his father.
The statue fragment of Amenhotep IV with nemes and double crown, which depicts the tall headdress and upper torso of Amenhotep IV, weighs more than 3,000 pounds and stands seven feet high; the Colossal statue of Amenhotep IV with nemes and Shu feathers shows his head, headdress, and the projecting feathers of the god Shu, god of air and son of the creator-god Atum, and that alone stands five feet tall.
1335 BC), was queen and wife of her brother Amenhotep IV (reigned c.
The first person we know of to suppose that there was only one divine influence that controlled everything was an Egyptian pharaoh named Amenhotep IV, who reigned over Egypt from 1379 to 1362 B.
FILE -- Ancient Egyptian Family FILE -- King Amenhotep IV and Queen Nefertari with their children FILE -- Mother taking care of her child Mother holding her child while baking bread [Photo Courtesy: Al Osrah Ayam El Faraa'na Book by Zahi Hawas] Women making beer [Photo Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons] Women and men harvesting crops [Photo Courtesy of Wikipedia] FILE - King Tutankhamen and Queen Ankhesenamun Women's Rights in the Ancient Egyptian Society Women in ancient Egypt participated in different sports and games and they also danced and played music to keep their bodies fit and strong.
It is "definitive evidence of the co-regency between Amenhotep III and Amenhotep IV," said antiquities minister Mohamed Ibrahim in a statement, referring to Akhenaten by his early title.
Ertman, "Images of Amenhotep IV and Nefertiti in the Style of the Previous Reign"; Richard A.