Webster's Dictionary

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Webster's Dictionary

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1828: Noah Webster published his American Dictionary of the English Language.
In 1828, the first edition of Noah Webster's ''American Dictionary of the English Language'' was published.
Joshua Kendall argues that Noah Webster, a man who made significant contributions to early American nationalism and in 1828 published the groundbreaking American Dictionary of the English Language, is a forgotten founding father.
NEW YEAR'S IN SE ASIAN CULTURES 1828: Noah Webster published his American Dictionary of the English Language.
Schoolchildren and college students who encounter the great work electronically have no way to fathom its physical might and bulk, and its weighty difference from all those other online dictionaries-whether today's Merriam-Webster or its forebear, Noah Webster's 1828 American Dictionary of the English Language, which in its online versions is sadly stripped of all quotations save those from the Bible.
The American Dictionary of the English Language formally defines "risk" as "the possibility of suffering harm or loss; danger." "Management" is defined as "the practice of managing, handling, or controlling something." The definition of "security" is "freedom from risk or danger." With these terms formally defined, the blended definition roughly describes risk management and security as the practice of controlling and mitigating the amount of loss an organization will have to endure because of any adverse action or situation, whether intentionally or unintentionally initiated.
In his American Dictionary of the English Language (1828), he went back to crowd, feather, group, island, instead, leopard, sew, soot, steady, thread, threat, thumb and women." In the 1838 edition Webster yielded even more ground to tradition, though he retained a few favorites--aker for acre and tung for tongue--which were removed from editions issued after his death.
See an etymological variant in The American Dictionary of the English Language (1969-78) under hanker 'From dialectal hank, probably from Dutch (dialectal) hankeren',(4) apparently holding with the hare and hunting with the hounds.
The monumental American Dictionary of the English Language by Noah Webster was published, a labor of more than 20 years.

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