American Indian Movement


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Related to American Indian Movement: Wounded Knee

American Indian Movement

(AIM), Native American civil-rights activist organization, founded in 1968 to encourage self-determination among Native Americans and to establish international recognition of their treaty rights. In 1972, members of AIM briefly took over the headquarters of the Bureau of Indian AffairsIndian Affairs, Bureau of,
created (1824) in the U.S. War Dept. and transferred (1849) to the U.S. Dept. of the Interior. The War Dept. managed Native American affairs after 1789, but a separate bureau was not set up for many years.
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 in Washington, D.C. They complained that the government had created the tribal councils on reservations in 1934 as a way of perpetuating paternalistic control over Native American development. In 1973, about 200 Sioux, led by members of AIM, seized the tiny village of Wounded KneeWounded Knee,
creek, rising in SW S.Dak. and flowing NW to the White River; site of the last major battle of the Indian wars. After the death of Sitting Bull, a band of Sioux, led by Big Foot, fled into the badlands, where they were captured by the 7th Cavalry on Dec.
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, S.Dak., site of the last great massacre of Native Americans by the U.S. cavalry (1890). Among their demands was a review of more than 300 treaties between the Native Americans and the federal government that AIM alleged were broken. Wounded Knee was occupied for 71 days before the militants surrendered. The leaders were subsequently brought to trial, but the case was dismissed on grounds of misconduct by the prosecution. AIM also sponsored talks resulting in the 1977 International Treaty Conference with the UN in Geneva, Switzerland.
References in periodicals archive ?
This was the period of the FBI covert program, "COINTELPRO" (Counterintelligence Program), when the American Indian Movement and the Black Panther Party, along with other antiwar and civil rights organizations, were listed by the FBI as "terrorist" organizations.
It was in this climate of Indian-white relations that the Buffalo Bill Wild West Show and American Indian Movement, a few decades later, were born.
I've always considered myself a man of integrity as a leader of the American Indian Movement and of Indian people.
American Indian Movement groups in Nebraska united in meetings in Kearney and Omaha to plan a strategy for receiving more of the church money.
The American Indian Movement (AIM) sponsored this newspaper, which was used an as attack instrument against the elected government of the Oglala Sioux Tribe.
Janklow first rose to prominence in the 1970s as a tough-on-crime attorney general, and he blamed much of South Dakota's crime on the American Indian Movement. He was relentless, and not always scrupulous, in his pursuit of AIM, saying "The only way to deal with the Indian problem in South Dakota is to put a gun to AIM leaders' heads and pull the trigger."
For those dear souls who believe that the FBI et al, will never try to trample upon the rights of patriotic citizens, just recall the Bureau's war against the civil rights movement, the FBI's harassment of the critics of U.S.backed massacres in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Nicaragua, and the Bureau's Cointelpro operation against the American Indian Movement and the Black Panther Party.
The Weathermen worked in tandem with the Black Panthers, the American Indian Movement, and other terrorist groups and criminal syndicates.
On February 3, Buddhist nuns Jun Yasuda, left, and Senji, right, pray while Fred Short of the American Indian Movement sings and drums in the parking lot of the San Quentin State Prison.
While the film's depiction of the desperately poor living conditions endured by Lakota tribespeople on the Pine Ridge, S.D., reservation is undeniably sobering and, in its own way, a portrait in social injustice, there is little of the bygone mood of radical opposition politics that has traditionally characterized the Lakota, long the leaders in the American Indian Movement and the tribe at the center of the Wounded Knee struggles.
Months later he became the founding director of an urban Native American centre in Cleveland and met Dennis Banks, who was developing the American Indian Movement. By 1970, he was the movement's national director, and over the next decade, according to the New YorkTimes, his deeds would make him America's best known Indian since Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse.
Shreve chronicles the origins of the National Indian Youth Council (NIYC) from its cultural and historical underpinnings in 19th century and early 20th century intertribal movements, through its trajectory and activities in the 1960s, and into its legacy with movements such as the American Indian Movement (AIM).

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