American Medical Association


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American Medical Association

(AMA), professional physicians' organization (founded 1847). Its goals are to protect the interests of American physicians, advance public health, and support the growth of medical science. The AMA investigates alleged cases of medical quackery, engages in medical research on drugs, foods, cosmetics, and other substances, and sponsors health education programs. The organization also approves in-hospital doctor training programs; it was largely responsible for the upgrading of American medical education in the early 20th cent. Other functions include monitoring professional ethics and supervising continuing medical education for physicians. In recent years, problems associated with the high cost of medical care and health insurance, as well as the ramifications of the AIDS crisis, have been extensively examined by the influential Journal of the American Medical Association. Another pressing issue has been complaints by many physicians about problems they have encountered in working for managed care organizations. AMA members have consistently voted to oppose a comprehensive system of national health insurance. Subdivisions of the AMA deal with such medical topics as maternal and child care, medical education, medicolegal problems, and mental health. There is also a section for each of the medical specialties. In 1999, the AMA had approximately 300,000 members.

Bibliography

See study by F. Campion (1984).

References in periodicals archive ?
AMPAC (American Medical Association PAC) Campaign School, April 18-22, 2007, in Arlington, Virg., 202-789-7465.
Prevalence and Trends in Obesity Among US Adults 1999-2000: Journal of the American Medical Association 2002; 288:1723-1727.
HIPAA: A Short-and Long-term Perspective for Health Care, (American Medical Association, 2002) $64.95 for members, $79.95 for non-members.
The American Medical Association Collection is a database of American Medical Association (AMA) journals that includes JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, Archives of Internal Medicine, and other AMA publications.
An American Medical Association ethics official called the findings "troubling."
Adelman, a pediatric surgeon and member of the hoard of trustees of the American Medical Association (AMA).
* An attempt to nullify the Death with Dignity Act in Oregon--the only state in the United States where physician aid in dying is legal--appears to be on the fast track in Congress after gaining the endorsements of the American Medical Association and the National Hospice Organization.
The American Medical Association, the American Public Health Association, the American Heart Association, and the American Lung Association also began advocating a ban.
This annual publication from the American Medical Association presents information on medical licensure requirements and statistics in the US for allopathic and osteopathic physicians, recruiters, employers, and consultants.
This manual from the American Medical Association lists all of the medical licensure requirements and statistics within the US, including information such as examination and endorsement fees, pass/fail percentages, re-registration and CME requirements and endorsement policies for physicians who already have an existing license from another state.
The American Medical Association recently approved a policy calling for the nation's wealthiest Americans to, at a minimum, carry catastrophic and preventive health care coverage.
Women experiencing auras were also nearly twice as likely to have chest tightness or to need heart surgery, and they were more than twice as likely to die from a cardiovascular problem during the study, the researchers report in the July 19 Journal of the American Medical Association.

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