Wild West

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Wild West

the western US during its settlement, esp with reference to its frontier lawlessness

Wild West

Apache
North American Indians of Southwest who fought against frontiersmen. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 123]
Arapaho
North American Plains Indians living along the Platte and Arkansas rivers. [Am. Hist.: EB, I: 477–478]
Bass, Sam
(1851–1878) desperado whose career inspired ballads. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 244]
Bean, Judge Roy
(c. 1825–1903) legendary frontier judge who ruled by one law book and a six-shooter. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 252]
Big Valley, The
portraying cattle-owning aristocrats of the Wild West. [TV: Terrace, I, 99–100]
Billy the Kid
(William H. Bonney, 1859–1881) Brooklyn-born gunman of the Wild West. [Am. Hist.: Worth, 27]
Bonanza
saga of the Cartwright family. [TV: Terrace, I, 111–112]
Boom Town
originally, a western town that prospered suddenly, usually because of gold mines nearby. [Am. Hist.: Misc.]
boot hill
typical graveyard of gunfighters and their victims. [Am. Folklore: Misc.]
Bowie knife
throwing weapon invented by James or Rezin Bowie, frontiersmen in Texas. [Am. Folklore: EB, II: 207]
Broken Arrow
a series depicting Indian–white man exploits. [TV: Terrace, I, 122]
Calamity Jane
(Martha Jane Canary Burke, c. 1852–1903) extraordinary markswoman and pony express rider. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 418]
California Trail
route used by pioneers, extending from Wyoming to Sacramento. [Am. Hist.: WB, 21: 440f]
Carson, Kit (Christopher)
(1809–1868) frontiersman, guide, and Indian fighter in the West and Southwest. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 466]
Cheyenne
North American Indians who made up part of the Wild West scene. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 562]
Cheyenne
cowboy of the strong, silent type. [TV: Terrace, I, 153–154]
Chisholm Trail
route used by traders and drovers bringing cattle from Texas to Kansas. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 543]
circuit rider
frontier Methodist preacher who served “appointments” (services) in cabins, schoolhouses, and even taverns. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 561]
Cochise
(c. 1815–1874) Apache Indian chief who led the fight against white men in the Southwest. [Am. Hist: NCE, 589]
Cody, “Buffalo Bill”
(1846–1917) ex-Army scout who joined and led a famous Wild West show. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 390]
Colt .45
six-shot revolver invented by Samuel Colt and used throughout the West. [Am. Hist.: WB, 4: 684–685]
Comanche North
American Indian tribe; often figured in Wild West stories. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 607]
Comstock Lode
richest silver deposit in U.S.; famous during frontier days. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 418]
Conestoga wagon
horse-drawn freight wagon; originated in the Conestoga Creek region in Pennsylvania. [Am. Hist.: EB, III: 72]
Crazy Horse
(1842–1877) Indian chief who led Sioux against the white men in the northern plains. [Am. Hist.: EB, III: 225–226]
Custer’s Last Stand
U.S. troops led by Col. Custer are massacred by the Indians at Little Big Horn, Montana (1877). [Am. Hist.: NCE, 701]
Deadwood Gulch
Wild West city in South Dakota where graves of Hickok and Annie Oakley are located. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 729]
Death Valley Days
vignettes depicting frontier life. [TV: Terrace, I, 195]
Dillon, Matt
frontier marshal of Dodge City. [TV: “Gun-smoke” in Terrace, I, 331]
Dodge City
onetime rowdy cowboy town under supervision of Bat Masterson and Wyatt Earp. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 776]
Earp, Wyatt
(1848–1929) U.S. cowboy, lawman, and gunfighter. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 819]
Geronimo
(1829–1909) renegade Indian of the Wild West. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 1076]
ghost town
town left vacant after gold strike; common during frontier days. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 1080]
Gunsmoke
Wild West television epic with Dodge City setting. [TV: Terrace, I, 331–332]
Hickok, “Wild Bill”
(1837–1876) famous marshal of the West. [Am. Hist.: Hart, 371]
High Noon
western film in which time is of the essence. [Am. Cinema: Griffith, 396–397]
Holliday, “Doc”
(fl. late 19th century) outlaw who helped Wyatt Earp fight the Clanton gang at O.K. Corral. [Am. Hist.: Misc.]
“Home on the Range”
popular song about the West “where the buffalo roam” and “the deer and the antelope play.” [Am. Culture: Misc.]
Indian Territory
area set aside for the Indians by the U.S. government. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 1331]
James, Jesse
(1847–1882) American outlaw of the Wild West. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 1395]
Lone Ranger, The
masked hero of the Wild West. [TV: Terrace, II, 34–35; Radio: Buxton, 143–144]
O.K. Corral
scene of famous gunfight between Wyatt Earp and the Clanton gang (1881). [Am. Hist.: WB, 6: 9]
Oakley, Annie
(1860–1926) sharpshooter; major attraction of Buffalo Bill’s show. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 1982]
“Oh, Bury Me Not on the Lone Prairie”
popular song about life in the West. [Am. Culture: Misc.]
Oregon Trail
wagon-train route used by pioneers, extending from Missouri to the Oregon Territory. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 2016]
Paladin
archetypal gunman who leaves a calling card. [TV: Have Gun, Will Travel in Terrace, I, 341]
Pecos Bill
giant folk hero famed for cowboy exploits. [Am. Lit.: Hart, 643]
Pony Express
relay mail service during frontier days. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 2190]
prairie schooner
horse-drawn wagon used by pioneers; its white canvas top resembled a schooner sailing on the prairie. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 2209]
Rawhide
series depicting cowboys as cattle-punchers along the Santa Fe trail. [TV: Terrace, II, 235]
Ringo, Johnny
(fl. late 19th century) notorious outlaw who fought many gun battles in the Southwest. [Am. Hist.: Misc.]
Santa Fe Trail
wagon-train route extending from Independence, Missouri to Santa Fe, New Mexico. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 2421]
Shane
a classic, serious western film about a pioneer family protected by a mysterious stranger. [Am. Cinema: Halliwell, 651]
Sioux
confederation of North American Indian tribes; last battle fought at Wounded Knee. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 2527]
Sitting Bull
(1831–1890) Indian chief who united the Sioux tribes against the white men. [Am. Hist.: EB, IX: 243–244]
Slade the Terrible
stagecoach agent and desperado known for shooting his enemies dead at the drop of a hat. [Am. Lit.: Mark Twain Roughing It in Magill I, 858]
Texas Rangers
established in 1835, a mounted fighting force to maintain law and order in the West. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 2723]
Tombstone
Arizona town known for its outlaws, prospectors, and gun battles (1800s). [Am. Hist.: EB, X: 36]
Wells Fargo
company that handled express service to western states; often robbed. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 2953]
Winchester 73
repeating rifle manufactured by Oliver Winches-ter and widely used by the settlers of the West. [Am. Hist.: EB, X: 699]
References in periodicals archive ?
by Ike The shootout has come to represent a period of the American Old West when the frontier was virtually an open range for outlaws.
PATRICK STEWART says that, according to director and western film buff Uli Edel, filmmaker John Huston often dreamed of shooting a version of Shakespeare's ``King Lear'' set in the American Old West.
It appears odd in retrospect that a city boy like Aaron Copland should today be so strongly associated with the American Old West, but his Billy the Kid and Rodeo from 1938 and 1942 respectively have established him so.
The journey takes the reader on a cattle roundup in the American Old West.
Initial TV commercials are set in the American Old West, ancient China and medieval times.
Based on the long running TV series, this film was also produced in colour by Jack Wrather The title character is a masked Texas Ranger in the American Old West, originally played by George Seaton, who gallops about righting injustices with the aid of his Indian sidekick, Tonto.
A French homage to the American Old West that comes at a lime when it is unusual to see much Gallic enthusiasm expressed for the cowboy mentality, "Requiem for Billy the Kid" advances a curious parallel between the famous outlaw and the contemporaneous poet Arthur Rimbaud.
The straight rye whiskey was named for frontier lawman Bat Masterson, one of the most famous American Old West personalities, because "I've always been fascinated by the role that saloons, card games and whiskey played in the gun slingino days of the Wild West and I wanted to tip our cap to a character from that time," Sebastiani explained.
Add the fact the land was part of a 17th century land grant handed down to Spanish settlers in what is now New Mexico by King Charles II of Spain, and you've got yourself big changes to one unique piece of the American Old West.
SOUTHLAKE, Texas -- Responsible for cultivating the cowboy culture, the western genre and a few notorious outlaws, the American Old West makes for an excellent vacation experience for today's travelers.
Thomas Oldfield of the United Kingdom dreams of the American Old West.
In Frontierland, they will have the opportunity to experience the American Old West of the 1880s.

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