badger

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Related to American badger: hog badger, Japanese badger

badger,

name for several related members of the weaselweasel,
name for certain small, lithe, carnivorous mammals of the family Mustelidae (weasel family). Members of this family are generally characterized by long bodies and necks, short legs, small rounded ears, and medium to long tails.
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 family. Most badgers are large, nocturnal, burrowing animals, with broad, heavy bodies, long snouts, large, sharp claws, and long, grizzled fur. The Old World badger, Meles meles, is found in Europe and in Asia N of the Himalayas; it is about 3 ft (90 cm) long, with a 4-in. (10-cm) tail, and weighs about 30 lb (13.6 kg). Its unusual coloring, light above and dark below, is unlike that of most mammals but is found in some other members of the family. The head is white, with a conspicuous black stripe on each side. European badgers live, often in groups, in large burrows called sets, which they usually dig in dry slopes in woods. They emerge at night to forage for food; their diet is mainly earthworms but also includes rodents, young rabbits, insects, and plant matter. The American badger, Taxidea taxus, is about 2 ft (60 cm) long, with a 5-in. (13-cm) tail and weighs 12 to 24 lb (5.4–10.8 kg); it is very short-legged, which gives its body a flattened appearance. The fur is yellowish gray and the face black, with a white stripe over the forehead and around each eye. It is found in open grasslands and deserts of W and central North America, from N Alberta to N Mexico. It feeds largely on rodents and carrion; an extremely swift burrower, it pursues ground squirrels and prairie dogs into their holes, and may construct its own living quarters 30 ft (9.1 m) below ground level. American badgers are solitary and mostly nocturnal; in the extreme north they sleep through the winter. Several kinds of badger are found in SE Asia; these are classified in a number of genera. Badgers are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Carnivora, family Mustelidae.
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badger

[′baj·ər]
(design engineering)
(engineering)
A tool used inside a pipe or culvert to remove any excess mortar or deposits.
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of eight species of carnivorous mammals in six genera comprising the subfamily Melinae of the weasel family (Mustelidae).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

badger

backwater valve: installation
1. A tool used inside a pipe or culvert to remove excess mortar or deposits.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

badger

1. any of various stocky omnivorous musteline mammals of the subfamily Melinae, such as Meles meles (Eurasian badger), occurring in Europe, Asia, and North America: order Carnivora (carnivores). They are typically large burrowing animals, with strong claws and a thick coat striped black and white on the head
2. honey badger another name for ratel
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The American Badger (Taxidea taxus) in Arkansas, with Emphasis on Expansion of Its Range into Northeastern Arkansas.
American badgers (Taxidea taxus) are mid-sized semi-fossorial mustelids and typically associate with open habitats, such as grasslands, shrub-steppe, or desert but also occur in forests, wetlands, and mountainous areas (Lindzey, 2003).
Adult male American badgers grow to about 2 feet long and weigh up to 20 pounds.
Although it's not common, American badgers have been known to live at altitudes as high as 12,000 feet.
Here we report observations between San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica) and American badgers that provide further insight into the interactions between badgers and canids.
TABLE 1.--Resource selection of American badgers (Taxidea taxus) within study areas (second-order) and home ranges (third-order) in Illinois (n = 18; 1990-1995) and Ohio (n = 5; 2005-2007).
Parsons, reported taking an American badger from Marion County on 29 November 2008.
Reduced food availability is thought to increase the size of home ranges of North American badgers (Lindzey, 1982; Minta, 1993).
American badgers were trapped at burrows by placing a pair of number-three, coil-spring traps (Duke Company, West Point, Mississippi) at the mouth of burrows.
Four species were detected frequently enough to estimate rates of use of habitat by study area: coyote, bobcat, American badger, and gray fox.
American badgers (Taxidea taxus) occur throughout the northern Great Plains (Messick, 1987) and are adapted to living in grassland habitat (Messick and Hornocker, 1981; Messick et al., 1981), which also provides cover for nesting ducks.

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