mastodon

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mastodon

(măs`tədŏn'), name for a number of prehistoric mammals of the extinct genus Mammut, from which modern elephants are believed to have developed. The earliest known forms lived in the Oligocene epoch in Africa. These were long-jawed mastodons about 4 1-2 ft (137 cm) high, with four tusks and a greatly elongated face. Their descendants in the Miocene epoch were the size of large elephants, the latest forms having long, flexible trunks, like those of elephants, and only two tusks. During Miocene times they spread over Europe, Asia, and North America. The mastodons were forest dwellers; they obtained their food by browsing and their teeth were more numerous and of a simpler form than those of the elephant. They were apparently extinct in the Old World by the early Pleistocene epoch but survived in North America until late Pleistocene times. They are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Proboscidae, family Mammutidae.
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mastodon

[′mas·tə‚dän]
(paleontology)
A member of the Mastodontidae, especially the genus Mammut.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mastodon

similar to the elephant, the mastodon is now extinct. [Ecology: Hammond, 290]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

mastodon

any extinct elephant-like proboscidean mammal of the genus Mammut (or Mastodon), common in Pliocene times
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
According to his data, the mammoths apparently died out earlier than the American mastodon. The latter probably survived a little later in isolated areas.
The extinction of the American mastodon and the Jefferson mammoth probably was the result of a number of unfavorable conditions that acted at the same time.
It is possible that extinction of the American mastodon was partly brought about by the barrier formed by the Great Lakes.
TABLE 1 Measurements (in [mm.sup.1]) of Teeth of the American Mastodon No.
The American mastodon and Jefferson mammoth were the largest Pleistocene animals to walk on Michigan soil.
The ancestors of the American mastodon reached North America from Eurasia via the Bering land bridge during Miocene time, approximately 18 million years ago.
Cuvier's term Mastodon has frequently been used as a generic name for the American mastodon, and "Mastodon americanus" is still used in a loose sense today because it is so prevalent in the literature (Jepsen 1960).
The foregoing are synonymous names, names that have been used in past years for the American mastodon in Michigan.
See Table 1 for measurements of American mastodon teeth in the University of Michigan Museum of Paleontology.

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