Sarracenia

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Sarracenia

 

(pitcher plant), a genus of plants of the family Sarraceniaceae. Pitcher plants are insectivorous perennial herbs. The rhizome, which reaches 25–30 cm in length and grows for 20 to 30 years, annually forms rosettes of pitcher-shaped leaves. The leaves, which measure up to 75–100 cm long and 5–8 cm across, usually have reddish veins and in bright sunlight often turn completely red. The species S. flava, commonly known as trumpets, has yellowish green leaves with red venation. The flowers of pitcher plants are solitary, large (4–10 cm across), and pentamerous; the petals are yellow (S. flava) or reddish purple. The style is broadened at the top into an umbrella-like structure that covers the stamens.

There are ten species of pitcher plants, distributed in North America, mainly along the eastern seaboard of the USA. The most common species is S. purpurea. Pitcher plants grow mainly in swampy forests and in sphagnum marshes.

References in periodicals archive ?
Commonly known as American pitcher plants, their leaves develop into pitchers that trap flies, bees, wasps and other insects attracted to the leaf by its colour and the secretion of nectar around the lip.
Ask most baseball fans which African American pitcher was the first to throw a major league no-hitter, and chances are good you will get the wrong answer.
Presenting an oftentimes compelling narrative enhanced by excerpts from mainstream newspapers and alternative presses, Lamb demonstrates how Robinson, along with Johnny Wright (the African American pitcher Branch Rickey signed at the same time), endured those first tension-filled weeks of integrated Major League baseball.
Japanese pitchers appear once a week while American pitchers are usually up every four or five days.
Horizontal abduction: Escamilla et al's (2002) investigation of differences between a group of American and Korean pitchers showed the higher velocity American pitchers to have an increase in the amount of horizontal abduction at stride foot contact (23 [+ or -] 12[degrees] vs.
"Maybe it's luck or the level of American pitchers has fallen," Harimoto told Sunday Morning, a weekly news and sports program.